Brandeis University
    Below are the Summer 2018 course offerings. By using the filters to narrow your search, you can find courses by department or by session. Please click on the row of the course you are interested in to view additional details. Questions about summer course offerings should be directed to summersc@brandeis.edu.

    Registration for Summer Session II, which begins on July 9, is open until June 30.

    View 2018 course syllabi on our website.
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    DepartmentCourse NumberCourse NameClass NumberSessionDayTime
    ANTH116AHuman Osteology2086Session IIM, T, TH1:30pm - 3:50pm
    ANTH5AHuman Origins2090Session IIM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    BCHM88BIntroductory Biochemistry2092Session IIM, T, W, Th11:00am-12:50pm
    BIOL15BCells and Organisms2682Session IM, T, W, Th11:00am-12:50pm
    BIOL26APlant Biology2681Online Session
    BISC11ABiodiversity Connections2098Online Session
    CHEM11AGeneral Chemistry I2100Session IM, T, TH, F8:30am - 10:50am
    CHEM11BGeneral Chemistry II2703Session IIM, T, TH, F8:30am - 10:50am
    CHEM18AGeneral Chemistry Laboratory I2104Session IM, TH1:00pm - 5:00pm
    CHEM18BGeneral Chemistry Laboratory II2704Session IIM, TH1:00pm - 5:00pm
    CHEM25AOrganic Chemistry I2108Session IM, T, TH, F8:30am - 10:50am
    CHEM25BOrganic Chemistry II2110Session IIM, T, TH, F8:30am - 10:50am
    CHEM29AOrganic Chemistry Laboratory I2112Session IT, TH1:00pm - 5:30pm
    CHEM29BOrganic Chemistry Laboratory II2114Session IIT, TH1:00pm - 5:30pm
    COSI12BAdvanced Programming Techniques2084Session IM, T, TH, F9:00am-10:50am
    COSI21AData Structures and the Fundamentals of Computing2080Session IM, T, TH, F11:00am-12:50pm
    ECON10AIntroduction to Microeconomics2116Session IM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    ECON171AFinancial Economics2118Session IIM, T, TH8:30am - 10:50am
    ECON20AIntroduction to Macroeconomics2120Session IM, T, TH1:30pm - 3:50pm
    ECON28BThe Global Economy2688Session IIM, T, TH1:30pm - 3:50pm
    ECON80AMicroeconomic Theory2122Session IM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    ECON82BMacroeconomic Theory2124Session IM, T, TH6:00pm - 8:20pm
    ENG79AScreenwriting Workshop: Beginning Screenplay2134Session IM, T, TH1:30pm - 3:50pm
    ENVS89AEnvironmental Internship Course2683Online Session
    FA3AIntroduction to Drawing I: Drawing into Painting2140Session IM, T, TH8:30am - 10:50am
    HIST56BWorld History to 19602152Online Session
    INT92GSummer Internship Course2218Online Session
    MATH10ATechniques of Calculus (a)2156Session IM, T, W, Th9:00am-10:50am
    MATH10BTechniques of Calculus (b)2158Session IIM, T, W, Th9:00am-10:50am
    MATH15AApplied Linear Algebra2160Session IM, T, W, Th9:00am-10:50am
    MATH20ATechniques of Calculus: Calculus of Several Variables2162Session IIM, T, W, Th11:00am-12:50pm
    MATH36AProbability2694Session IIM, T, W, Th11:00am-12:50pm
    MATH8AIntroduction to Probability and Statistics2166Session IM, T, W, Th11:00am-12:50pm
    NEJS185BThe Making of the Modern Middle East2692Session IIM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    NPSY11BIntroduction to Behavioral Neuroscience2174Session IM, T, TH6:00pm - 8:20pm
    NPSY199AHuman Neuropsychology2691Session IIM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    PHIL1AIntroduction to Philosophy2176Session IM, T, TH8:30am - 10:50am
    PHYS10AIntroduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena I2180Session IM, T, W, Th9:00am-10:50am
    PHYS10BIntroduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena II2182Session IIM, T, W, Th9:00am-10:50am
    PHYS18AIntroductory Laboratory I2695Session IT, TH1:00pm - 5:00pm
    PHYS18BIntroductory Laboratory II2696Session IIT, TH1:00pm - 5:00pm
    PSYC10AIntroduction to Psychology2184Session IM, T, TH1:30pm - 3:50pm
    PSYC148AApplied Statistical Computing in R2685Online Session
    PSYC51AStatistics2188Session IM, T, TH8:30am - 10:50am
    PSYC52AResearch Methods and Laboratory in Psychology2564Session IIM, T, TH8:30am - 10:50am
    SOC1AOrder and Change in Society2686Online Session
    THA130ASuzuki2196Session IM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    THA15B-1Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication2200Online Session
    THA15B-2Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication2214Session IM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    THA15B-3Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication2202Session IIM, T, TH1:30pm - 3:50pm
    THA15B-4Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication2204Session IIM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    THA71APlaywriting2198Online Session
    UWS25AThe Good, The Bad, and The Slimy: The Aliens of Science-Fiction2701Session IIM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    UWS37BBorder Crossings2722Session IIM, T, TH8:30am - 10:50am
    X
    ANTH 116A: Human Osteology
    Instructor: Urcid, Javier
    Course Description: This course reviews in detail human skeletal anatomy for the proper identification of the bones in the body, their biomechanical articulations and their relationship with the muscular system. The focus is then directed to studying forensic methods and techniques for the estimation of age at death, determination of sex, assessment of type of bone remodeling, identification of cultural modifications to bone, and of the impact of environmental processes on bony tissue. During this course, hands-on laboratory sessions will involve team analysis of human remains from the comparative collection in the Archaeology Laboratory at Brandeis.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:30pm - 3:50pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2086
    Fulfillment: SS, SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    ANTH 5A: Human Origins
    Instructor: Urcid, Javier
    Course Description: This course covers the development of human biological and cultural endowments through a span of some 5 million years, from a hominoid stage and a foraging economy to the origins of anatomically modern humans. A consideration of humans’ place in nature as well as a review of evolutionary principles leads to discuss the archaeological findings of hominids in a diachronic framework. The journey through the bio-cultural transformation of humanity highlights the transition to bipedal locomotion, the acquisition of language, and changes in subsistence economies.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2090
    Fulfillment: SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    BCHM 88B: Introductory Biochemistry
    Instructor: Piasta, Kene
    Course Description: In this course, topics will include protein and nucleic acid structure; metabolism of biologically important compounds. We will also explore the formation and utilization of "energy-rich" compounds; introduction to enzyme mechanism; comparison of basic biochemical and chemical processes; and biochemical basis of disease.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:00am-12:50pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2092
    Fulfillment: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: One year organic chemistry with laboratory, BIOL 14a, and BIOL 15b. Does not meet the requirements for the major in biochemistry.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    BIOL 15B: Cells and Organisms
    Instructor: Piasta, Kene
    Course Description: This course introduces contemporary biology with an emphasis on cells, organs, and organ systems. In this class, topics will include the forms and functions of macromolecules, organelles, and cells, the integration of cells into tissues, and the physiology of fundamental life processes. The course is intended to prepare students to understand the biology of everyday life, and to provide a strong foundation for those who continue to study the life sciences.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:00am-12:50pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2682
    Fulfillment: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    BIOL 26A: Plant Biology
    Instructor: Kosinski-Collins, Melissa
    Course Description: All online courses require a brief online orientation. Before you can enroll, you will need to email summersc@brandeis.edu to receive access to the online orientation in LATTE. Upon completion of the orientation, you will receive the code to enroll in the course. BIOL 26a is designed for students who have taken BIOL 14a and BIOL 15B and are interested in learning the fundamentals of plant biology. The course is intended for students who are familiar with central dogma, structure-function relationship and genetic inheritance, but have not yet applied those concepts in plant systems.
    Session: Online Session
    Day:
    Time:
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2681
    Fulfillment: SN
    Enrollment Limit: 12
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisites: BIOL 14a and BIOL 15b.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    BISC 11A: Biodiversity Connections
    Instructor: Hitchcock, Colleen
    Course Description: All online courses require a brief online orientation. Before you can enroll, you will need to email summersc@brandeis.edu to receive access to the online orientation in LATTE. Upon completion of the orientation, you will receive the code to enroll in the course. The goal of this online course is to explore the evolution, extinction, and conservation of biodiversity for students not majoring in the sciences. Students leaving this course will have a firm grasp of the scientific method, the benefits and limitations of scientific conclusions and the interplay between science and society. In the online environment we will explore topics through a variety of formats to promote both instructor lead and peer facilitated learning. It is impossible to explore biodiversity without promoting bioliteracy of the flora and fauna local to students. This is course will introduce students to digital species identification tools and make use of iNaturalist (www.iNaturalist.org). iNaturalist is a worldwide citizen science platform that enables users to build naturalist skills and connect with a broader local community of naturalists while at the same time providing worldwide data on species distribution to the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (www.gbif.org). Given the online structure of this course and presumed varied geographic location of students, complementing our work with this citizen science experience will enable students to have a place-based experience and develop life-long naturalist skills. In addition, it will offer insight to non-majors in the type of science contributions they can make now and in the future.
    Session: Online Session
    Day:
    Time:
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2098
    Fulfillment: SN
    Enrollment Limit: 12
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    CHEM 11A: General Chemistry I
    Instructor: Wairegi, Angeline
    Course Description: Chemistry 11 - A covers a wide array of topics, embracing aspects of descriptive, as well as quantitative chemistry. No prior study of chemistry is assumed as the course begins by looking at the atomic foundation of matter, the elements, and the organization of the Periodic Table, working its way up to an examination of how atoms are bonded together to form larger units of matter. Students who complete this course will have an understanding of the three major phases of matter—solids, liquids, and gases—and how they behave, as well as a knowledge of the major types of chemical reactions and how to represent them. A strong focus is placed on developing students quantitative reasoning skills in solving scientific problems – a skill that students can apply in a multitude of fields.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2100
    Fulfillment: SN, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification:
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    CHEM 11B: General Chemistry II
    Instructor: Vela, Michael
    Course Description: This course covers basic chemical principles, with examples drawn from the chemistry of living systems as well as from environmental chemistry and materials science. Topics covered include chemical equilibrium, acid/­base chemistry, kinetics, thermodynamics,electrochemistry, radioactivity and nuclear chemistry, and coordination chemistry. The combination of the two summer sessions covers the same material presented in CHEM 11A and CHEM 11A to all science majors during the academic year.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2703
    Fulfillment: SN, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Available for Graduate Credit
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 11a or an approved equivalent. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have passed CHEM 15b in previous years. Four class hours and one sixty-minute structured study group session per week. The corresponding lab is CHEM 18b.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    CHEM 18A: General Chemistry Laboratory I
    Instructor: Wairegi, Angeline
    Course Description: Chemistry 18A is the companion course to Chemistry 11A. It is designed so that the experiments follow the lecture topics giving students a hands-on way to help them understand the material they are learning. No prior experience in a laboratory setting is assumed, and instruction in the use of all equipment will be provided. This course will expose students to a wide range of laboratory techniques and concepts, beginning with basic measurements, pipetting, and an understanding of quantitative error. Students will also be introduced to computer data collection, analytical chemistry, qualitative analysis, and instrumental analysis.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, TH
    Time: 1:00pm - 5:00pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Class Number: 2104
    Fulfillment:
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification:
    Course Tuition: $1,882 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees: $125
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    CHEM 18B: General Chemistry Laboratory II
    Instructor: Vela, Michael
    Course Description: This is the second semester of the general chemistry laboratory program. Continued use of probes interfaced with computers to monitor pH and electrical conductivity changes in titrating weak monoprotic and polyprotic amino acids, to monitor pressure changes as part of a kinetics study, and to monitor voltage changes of electrochemical cells with temperature so as to establish thermodynamic parameters for redox reactions. Also included is identification of unknowns based on selective precipitation.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, TH
    Time: 1:00pm - 5:00pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2704
    Fulfillment:
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $1,882 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees: $125
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 18a and CHEM 11a. Corequisite: CHEM 11b. Dropping CHEM 11b necessitates written permission from the lab instructor to continue with this course. May yield half-course credit toward rate of work and graduation.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    CHEM 25A: Organic Chemistry I
    Instructor: Mascall, Kristen
    Course Description: Organic chemistry is the fascinating study of carbon-containing compounds. CHEM 25A is the first module of a two-semester course that introduces fundamental topics of structure, function, and reactivity of organic molecules. The course will explore how and why organic reactions occur. The significance of organic chemistry to biological systems, medicine, environmental science, and industry will be emphasized through current literature examples. A strong focus will be placed on developing proficiency in problem-solving – applying conceptual knowledge to derive a solution to an unfamiliar problem – a skill that extends way beyond classroom use. This course meets the first half of the organic chemistry requirement for chemistry, biology, premedical, and pre-dental majors when taken in conjunction with the laboratory course CHEM 29A. It is also useful for individuals in the physical and life science fields who wish to gain a working knowledge of organic chemistry.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2108
    Fulfillment: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    CHEM 25B: Organic Chemistry II
    Instructor: Mascall, Kristen
    Course Description: As a continuation of CHEM 25A, this course meets the second half of the organic chemistry requirement for chemistry, biology, premedical, and pre-dental majors when taken in conjunction with the laboratory course, CHEM 29B. The course will build upon concepts of structure and reactivity from CHEM 25A. Much emphasis will be placed on the chemistry of carbonyl compounds, and other biologically relevant molecules such as carbohydrates. Organic compounds of chemical, medicinal, and biological interest will be examined through current literature examples.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2110
    Fulfillment: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 25a or its equivalent.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    CHEM 29A: Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
    Instructor: Mascall, Kristen
    Course Description: The CHEM 29A laboratory course affords practical experience in the synthesis, isolation, and analysis of organic compounds. Various techniques are introduced, including extraction, distillation, chromatography, and crystallization. Experimental procedures reported in current literature will be adapted in the lab to prepare molecules of biological significance. Spectroscopic methods are introduced as a means of analyzing compound structures.
    Session: Session I
    Day: T, TH
    Time: 1:00pm - 5:30pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Class Number: 2112
    Fulfillment:
    Enrollment Limit: 64 - max capacity of the lab
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $1,882 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees: $125
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 18b or 19b or the equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 25a. Dropping CHEM 25a necessitates written permission from lab instructor to continue with this course.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    CHEM 29B: Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
    Instructor: Mascall, Kristen
    Course Description: As a continuation of CHEM 29A, this course is designed to provide additional experience in important techniques of synthesis, purification, and analysis of organic compounds. Experimental procedures reported in current literature will be adapted in the lab to prepare molecules of biological significance. Modern methods such as microwave-accelerated organic synthesis will be introduced. Spectroscopic methods will be used to analyze compound identity and purity.
    Session: Session II
    Day: T, TH
    Time: 1:00pm - 5:30pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Class Number: 2114
    Fulfillment:
    Enrollment Limit: 64 - max capacity of the lab
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $1,882 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees: $125
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 29A or the equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 25B
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    COSI 12B: Advanced Programming Techniques
    Instructor: DiLillo, Antonella
    Course Description: The course will introduce students to object oriented programming using Java. It will focus on more sophisticated features such as design of classes, interfaces, packages, and APIs. It will also cover the basic principles of software design, testing and collaborative programming. Upon completion of this class, students will be able to understand the concept of object-oriented programming (OOP) as well as the purpose and usage of inheritance, polymorphism, encapsulation and method overloading. They will be able to create Java application programs using sound OOP practices (e.g., interfaces and APIs) and proper program structuring. Finally, they will be able to develop programs using the Java Collection API as well as the Java standard class library.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 9:00am-10:50am
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2084
    Fulfillment: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees: $100
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: COSI 11a or programming facility in C.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    COSI 21A: Data Structures and the Fundamentals of Computing
    Instructor: DiLillo, Antonella
    Course Description: This course focuses on the design and analysis of algorithms and the use of data structures.Through the introduction of the most widely used data structures employed in solving commonly encountered problems (e.g. lists, trees, and graphs), students will learn different ways to organize data for easy access and efficient manipulation. Algorithms to solve classic problems (e.g. searching, sorting, hashing, graph algorithms, etc.) will be presented, as well as classic algorithm design strategies (e.g. divide-and-conquer and greedy algorithms). Computational complexity theory will be introduced for studying the efficiency of the algorithms covered in the course.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 11:00am-12:50pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2080
    Fulfillment: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees: $100
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: COSI 11a and either COSI 12b or permission from the Undergraduate Advising Head or Graduate Program Director.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    ECON 10A: Introduction to Microeconomics
    Instructor: Laski, Anne
    Course Description: This course is an introduction to the field of microeconomics, and is intended for all possible economics majors, minors, and for all other students who plan to take Econ 20 (Introduction to Macroeconomics) later in their academic career. This is the first economics course that economics students should take at Brandeis, and anyone contemplating a major or minor should start with this course. It will give you an idea of the range of behaviors that economists investigate, introduce you to the basic tools that we use to analyze economic behavior, and apply these tools to public policy issues. Perhaps most important, this course will introduce you to the “economic way of thinking,” an approach to decision making that applies to personal decisions, to the decisions of businesses, labor unions and other organizations, and to the larger choices that society faces. This course satisfies the School of Social Science distribution requirement and the Quantitative Reasoning component of the General University Requirements. It is also the first course for any student considering a concentration or minor in Economics. This course has two “broad” goals. First, it is hoped that everyone will come out of this course a more educated citizen, being able to use basic economic principles to critically evaluate the arguments for and against public policy proposals (various tax proposals, immigration reform). Second, this course should give students the theoretical tools necessary for success in subsequent economics courses.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2116
    Fulfillment: SS, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    ECON 171A: Financial Economics
    Instructor: Makolo, Jean Claude
    Course Description: The course covers topics related to financial economics, including investors’ attitudes toward risk, capital allocation, portfolio selection, and asset pricing models (Capital Asset Pricing Model and Arbitrage Pricing Theory). We will also address the efficient market hypothesis, fixed income markets, equity valuation, and options and futures markets.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2118
    Fulfillment: SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisites: ECON 80a and ECON 83a or permission of the instructor.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    ECON 20A: Introduction to Macroeconomics
    Instructor: Jia, Wei
    Course Description: This course provides an introduction to macroeconomics. Macroeconomics is the study of overall or aggregate economic performance of national economies. The course will develop the main models economists use to understand the relationships between economic growth, unemployment, inflation, interest rates, and exchange rates in the long run and in the short run. The course will also focus on the role of government policy in promoting economic growth in the long run and in limiting the effects of business cycle fluctuations in the short run.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:30pm - 3:50pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2120
    Fulfillment: SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: ECON 2a with a B+ or higher or ECON 10a. May not be taken for credit by students concurrently with or after they have taken ECON 82b.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    ECON 28B: The Global Economy
    Instructor: AlMehdar, Mohammed
    Course Description: This course supplies the basic tools and models of economic analysis to a wide range of topics in micro-, macro-, and international economics. This course examines the causes and effects of international flows ofgoods, services, labor, and capital. We will also look at the impact of government policiestoward those flows and at the institutions that have been established to regulate internationaltrade and finance, including the World Trade Organization and the International Monetary Fund.The course considers both the microeconomic and macroeconomic effects of internationaltransactions. In the microeconomic portion of the course, we will consider a number ofeconomic models of international trade in goods and services. We will use these models topredict the effects of free trade as well as the effects of government interventions that wouldeither reduce (e.g., tariffs, quotas) or increase (e.g., export subsidies) the volume of trade. Wewill also discuss the causes and effects of international flows of labor (migration) and capital(investment).
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:30pm - 3:50pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2688
    Fulfillment: SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisites: ECON 2a or ECON 10a and ECON 20a. ECON 20a may be taken concurrently with ECON 28b.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    ECON 80A: Microeconomic Theory
    Instructor: Zhu, Mengnan
    Course Description: To enroll, please contact Leslie Yancich, the Econ Department administrator, lesliey@brandeis.edu, for a consent code. This class will serve as an analysis of the behavior of economic units within a market economy. Emphasis will be placed upon individuals' decisions as demanders of goods and suppliers of resources, and firms' decisions as suppliers of goods and demanders of resources under various market structures.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2122
    Fulfillment: SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: ECON 10a. Students must earn C- or higher in MATH 10a, or otherwise satisfy the calculus requirement, to enroll in this course.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    ECON 82B: Macroeconomic Theory
    Instructor: AlMehdar, Mohammed
    Course Description: To enroll, please contact Leslie Yancich, the Econ Department administrator, lesliey@brandeis.edu, for a consent code. This course will provide a study of models of the determination of economic aggregates, such as national income, consumption, and investment. We will also explore government spending, exports, imports, and international capital flows, and economy-wide variables, such as the interest rate, the exchange rate, the price level and inflation, and the unemployment rate. In this course, we will examine the influence of fiscal and monetary policies on these aggregates and variables.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 6:00pm - 8:20pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2124
    Fulfillment: SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: ECON 20a. Students must earn C- or higher in MATH 10a, or otherwise satisfy the calculus requirement, to enroll in this course.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    ENG 79A: Screenwriting Workshop: Beginning Screenplay
    Instructor: Weinberg, Marc
    Course Description: There's never been a better time to become a screenwriter. Breakthroughs in technology, production, and distribution have heightened the demand for good scripts. Whether you want to write a micro-budget indie or a Hollywood blockbuster, this course provides all the essential tools you’ll need. Learn the fundamentals – structure, story arc, character development – and develop the first act of your feature screenplay. You’ll also watch and analyze recent movies. Join us for a creative, low-pressure course over five weeks, and you’ll never look at a movie the same way again!
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:30pm - 3:50pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2134
    Fulfillment: Writing Intensive, HUM
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    ENVS 89A: Environmental Internship Course
    Instructor: Stalsberg Canelli, Alyssa
    Course Description: All online courses require a brief online orientation. Before you can enroll, you will need to email summersc@brandeis.edu to receive access to the online orientation in LATTE. Upon completion of the orientation, you will receive the code to enroll in the course. The Environmental Studies Internship Program provides the opportunity for you to experience first-hand current environmental challenges in government, industry, public interest organizations, and scientific research institutions. Students in the internship program and course tackle current environmental issues alongside professionals in the field, experiencing the real-life context and application of their coursework. Weekly journals, seminar discussions, other writings and reflections provide perspective and a broader context for the internship experience, and enable you to share your internship experiences among the our seminar group and to a broader audience at the Environmental Internship Symposium. Each internship placement is ideally individually tailored to support your own interests, academic goals and experience. All placements should require the use of your skills in research, writing, analysis, fieldwork and communication in a supervised setting to accomplish specific projects or goals within a designated time frame.During the course of the seminar, you will explore both the nature of your placement organizations and your own personal goals for future academic study, work and careers. Seminar topics will range broadly from organizational mission and goals, funding and behaviors, to your own hopes for the future. You will have the opportunity to examine issues such as the nature of professionalism, ethical dilemmas at the workplace and non-profit fundraising. Further, together we will consider career options and you will be able to discuss with professionals your own plans beyond Brandeis and current tools for getting started in the job search process.
    Session: Online Session
    Day:
    Time:
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2683
    Fulfillment: OC
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    FA 3A: Introduction to Drawing I: Drawing into Painting
    Instructor: Downey, Sean
    Course Description: This class is an introduction to the materials and methods of drawing with wet media, intended for both studio majors and non-majors. This course will explore wet media as a bridge between drawing and painting, and will introduce students to traditional and contemporary approaches to using ink, watercolor, collage, mixed media, and color. Using drawing concepts as a basis for seeing and sharpening perception, students will learn a wide variety of approaches and techniques for creating convincing and accurate drawings from observation. Subject matter will include still-life, landscape, portraiture, and the figure.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2140
    Fulfillment: CA
    Enrollment Limit: 17, limit is due to the constraints of studio facilities
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees: $75.00
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    HIST 56B: World History to 1960
    Instructor: Miller, Marlyn
    Course Description: All online courses require a brief online orientation. Before you can enroll, you will need to email summersc@brandeis.edu to receive access to the online orientation in LATTE. Upon completion of the orientation, you will receive the code to enroll in the course. This course explores major processes and events in the history of the world from 1450 to 1960, including European expansion, global trade and immigration, industrialization, colonization, war, and environmental change. Using film, literature, primary sources, and artifacts, we will investigate the way cultures coming into contact have influenced each other, and how those contacts have helped to shape the world we live in today.
    Session: Online Session
    Day:
    Time:
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2152
    Fulfillment: SS, NW
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    INT 92G: Summer Internship Course
    Instructor: Stalsberg Canelli, Alyssa
    Course Description: The purpose of this one-credit hour course is to help students to think critically about the organization and industry in which they are currently interning, while developing and articulating their personal narrative. Students will use their assignments and reflections to analyze their internship experience and articulate their academic, professional and personal goals, motivations and values. Through this process, students build their own meta-awareness about their learning process and how to extend it in the future. Students will also benefit from the collective learning of their peers. The activities and assignments for this course have been developed using active and reflective learning in order to help students maximize their internship experience.
    Session: Online Session
    Day:
    Time:
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 1 Credits
    Class Number: 2218
    Fulfillment:
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $416 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    MATH 10A: Techniques of Calculus (a)
    Instructor: Pathak, Aritro
    Course Description: This class is an introduction to differential (and some integral) calculus of one variable, with emphasis on techniques and applications.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am-10:50am
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2156
    Fulfillment: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade of C- or higher in MATH 5a or placement by examination. Students may not take MATH 10a if they have received a satisfactory grade in MATH 10b or MATH 20a.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    MATH 10B: Techniques of Calculus (b)
    Instructor: Gupta, Abhishek
    Course Description: This course is an introduction to differential (and some integral) calculus of one variable, with emphasis on techniques and applications
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am-10:50am
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2158
    Fulfillment: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade of C- or higher in MATH 5a or placement by examination. Students may not take MATH 10a if they have received a satisfactory grade in MATH 10b or MATH 20a.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    MATH 15A: Applied Linear Algebra
    Instructor: Morris-Wright, Rose
    Course Description: This course will address matrices, determinants, linear equations, vector spaces, eigenvalues, quadratic forms, linear programming. There will be an emphasis on techniques and applications.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am-10:50am
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2160
    Fulfillment: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites: Prerequisites: MATH 5a and permission of the instructor, placement by examination, or any mathematics course numbered 10 or above. Students may take MATH 15a or 22a for credit, but not both.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    MATH 20A: Techniques of Calculus: Calculus of Several Variables
    Instructor: Deibel, Angelica
    Course Description: Among the topics addressed in this course are vectors and vector-valued functions, partial derivatives and multiple integrals, extremum problems, line and surface integrals, Green's and Stokes's theorems. There will also be an emphasis on techniques and applications.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:00am-12:50pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2162
    Fulfillment: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: MATH 10a and b or placement by examination. Students may take MATH 20a or 22b for credit, but not both. Students may not take MATH 10a or 10b concurrently with MATH 20a.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    MATH 36A: Probability
    Instructor: Levear, Duncan
    Course Description: This course will address sample spaces and probability measures, elementary combinatorial examples. Conditional probability. We will also discuss random variables, expectations, variance, distribution and density functions as well as independence and correlation. Chebychev's inequality and the weak law of large numbers will be taught in this course along with the central limit theorem and Markov and Poisson processes.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:00am-12:50pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2694
    Fulfillment: SN, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: MATH 20a or 22b.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    MATH 8A: Introduction to Probability and Statistics
    Instructor: Liu, Qing
    Course Description: This course addresses discrete probability spaces, random variables, expectation, and variance. In this class we will also discuss approximation by the normal curve, sample mean and variance, and confidence intervals. This course does not require calculus; only high school algebra and graphing of functions
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:00am-12:50pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2166
    Fulfillment: SN, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    NEJS 185B: The Making of the Modern Middle East
    Instructor: Geller, Randall
    Course Description: One hundred years ago, the borders of modern Middle Eastern states did not exist; conquering European countries carved up the former Ottoman Empire and created new states – and new problems. In this class we will explore the development of each Middle Eastern country’s unique identity and history and the domestic and foreign problems, policies, and issues each country faces today. In this context we will explore the role of the Great Powers after World War I, the role of the United States in the promotion of regime change in the Arab and broader Muslim world and its effects on the region today, as well as more recent Russian intervention in Syria. We will explore tensions between Arab nationalism and political Islam and the after-effects of the Arab Spring. We will learn about the war and the mass refugee crisis in Syria and how the region, Europe, and the United States intends to manage it. We will explore the role of ISIS and other militant groups, the Shii Islamic theocracy in Iran, as well as tensions between a legacy of secularism after World War I and a return to Islamism in Turkey. Finally, we will explore how ethnic and sectarian differences impact and define each Middle Eastern country’s social and political development. The class will be discussion-based with lecture; relevant video footage will be used to illuminate the region’s unique history and political style.This course is available for graduate credit.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2692
    Fulfillment: HUM, SS, NW
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    NPSY 11B: Introduction to Behavioral Neuroscience
    Instructor: Pipkin, Jason
    Course Description: This course will review data and theories regarding current conceptions of brain-behavior relationships. We will begin with an introduction to neural systems as classically defined (sensory, association, motor, autonomic), and move on to examination of the biological underpinnings of various behaviors, from those relating to basic drives (reproduction, feeding) to those with a cognitive flavor. Throughout, the accent is on interactions between organisms and environment (learning)
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 6:00pm - 8:20pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2174
    Fulfillment: SN, SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification:
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) or MATH 10a or permission of the instructor. May meet the requirements for the major in Biology.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    NPSY 199A: Human Neuropsychology
    Instructor: Mitchell, Teresa
    Course Description: Neuropsychology is the study of the relationship between the brain and behavior. It exists on a continuum between cognitive neuroscience, which focuses on typical functioning, and neurology, which focuses on therapeutic intervention for disease and injury. Neuropsychology was initially about understanding the relationship between a unique pattern of behavioral symptoms and the location of the brain damage that gives rise to it. Its scope has broadened over time as non-invasive techniques for studying the brain have developed. In this course, we will learn basic neuroanatomy and understand how distinct brain regions and networks of brain regions work to produce behaviors studied by psychologists.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2691
    Fulfillment: SS, SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: Psych 10a (formerly PSYC 1A) or Math 10A and at least sophomore standing.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    PHIL 1A: Introduction to Philosophy
    Instructor: Marusic, Berislav
    Course Description: This course will offer a problem-based introduction to philosophy. We will consider the following philosophical questions: What can we know about the world external to our senses? What can we know about the thoughts and feelings of others? What is the relationship between our minds and our brains? What makes certain sounds and inscriptions meaningful, while most other sounds and inscriptions are not? Can we have free will in a causally determined world governed by natural laws? What makes an action right or wrong? What does justice require of us? What is the evil of death? What is the meaning of life? The course aims to motivate these questions and introduce students to the methods of contemporary analytic philosophy.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2176
    Fulfillment: HUM
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites: Completion of the Brandeis Summer School online orientation is required.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    PHYS 10A: Introduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena I
    Instructor: Martens, Edward
    Course Description: This class is an introduction to Newtonian mechanics, kinetic theory, and thermodynamics.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am-10:50am
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2180
    Fulfillment: SN, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: REGISTRAR > BULLETIN > 2017-2018 > COURSES > SUBJECTS > PHYSICS COURSES OF STUDY Minor Major (BA/BS) Master of Science Doctor of Philosophy SECTIONS Expand All | Collapse All DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Last updated: January 11, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. Objectives Learning Goals How to Become a Major How to Be Admitted to the Graduate Program Faculty Requirements for the Minor Requirements for the Major Special Notes Relating to Undergraduates Requirements for Advanced Degrees Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy Courses of Instruction (1-99) Primarily for Undergraduate Students EL 24b QBReC Lab Corequisite: FYS 11a. Course may be taken as a prerequisite within the past year with permission of the instructor. Yields half-course credit. Students explore the living world through experimental and computational projects conducted in research labs. The emphasis is on interdisciplinary science where techniques from physics, chemistry and biology are used to develop a quantitative understanding of life at the molecular and cellular level. Usually offered every year. Mr. Kondev FYS 11a Nature's Nanotechnology [ sn ] Familiarity with high school math, physics, chemistry and biology is expected. Imagine a world occupied by machines whose size is 10,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair. Some of them produce fuel by harnessing solar energy, while others transport cargo on tracks only 10 atoms across, or assemble other machines following molecular blueprints. This is the bustling world inside a living cell, which we will explore using high school level math, physics and biology. Usually offered every year. Mr. Kondev (Physics) FYS 71b Exploring Dark Matter and Dark Energy in the New Universe [ qr sn ] Prerequisite: Familiarity with pre-calculus mathematics is required. Some knowledge of physics is recommended. Dark matter and dark energy make up 96 percent of the universe but we know very little about them. This course explores what we know and don't know, and what we hope to find out with new experiments and observations. Usally offered every second year. Staff PHSC 2b Introductory Astronomy [ qr sn ] Does not meet requirements for the major in physics. Elementary physical ideas will be used to discuss the life and death of stars, the structure of the galaxies, and the large-scale features and evolution of the universe. Usually offered every year. Staff PHYS 10a Introduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena I [ qr sn ] Corequisite: MATH 10a or equivalent. Usually taken with PHYS 18a.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    PHYS 10B: Introduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena II
    Instructor: Martens, Edward
    Course Description: This course is an introduction to electricity and magnetism, and optics. We will also explore special theory of relativity, and the structure of the atom.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am-10:50am
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2182
    Fulfillment: SN, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: PHYS 10a. Usually taken with PHYS 18b.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    PHYS 18A: Introductory Laboratory I
    Instructor: Mistark, Peter
    Course Description: This course is a co requisite for the Physics 10A course. In this course students will learn the scientific method through hands on application of material learned in the lecture component of this course.
    Session: Session I
    Day: T, TH
    Time: 1:00pm - 5:00pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Class Number: 2695
    Fulfillment:
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $1,882 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees: $50.00
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Corequisite: PHYS 10a. May yield half-course credit toward rate-of-work and graduation. Two semester-hour credits.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    PHYS 18B: Introductory Laboratory II
    Instructor: Mistark, Peter
    Course Description: The introductory lab II is a continuation of introductory lab I. In this lab, students will continue to experience a hands on approach to learning the fundamentals of physics as well as learning techniques associated with preforming experimental science.
    Session: Session II
    Day: T, TH
    Time: 1:00pm - 5:00pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Class Number: 2696
    Fulfillment:
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $1,882 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees: $50.00
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Corequisite: PHYS 10b. May yield half-course credit toward rate-of-work and graduation. Two semester-hour credits.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    PSYC 10A: Introduction to Psychology
    Instructor: Paige, Laura
    Course Description: This course offers a survey of contemporary psychology. Topics in this course will include brain and behavior, perception, memory, learning, cognitive processes, plasticity, child and adult development, personality, social behavior, and the relationship between normal and abnormal behavior. This course will also look at the ways in which psychology is presented in the media, connecting ideas we have discussed in class with everyday life.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:30pm - 3:50pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2184
    Fulfillment: SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites: May not be taken for credit by students who took PSYC 1a in prior years.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    PSYC 148A: Applied Statistical Computing in R
    Instructor: Liu, Xiaodong
    Course Description: All online courses require a brief online orientation. Before you can enroll, you will need to email summersc@brandeis.edu to receive access to the online orientation in LATTE. Upon completion of the orientation, you will receive the code to enroll in the course. This course has two main goals: 1) it is designed for students who would like to learn to do statistical computing, programming, and graphical presentation in R and 2) it is designed for students with some background in descriptive and inferential statistics who would like to further their understanding of inferential statistics and statistical modeling.
    Session: Online Session
    Day:
    Time:
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2685
    Fulfillment: QR, SS
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Available for Graduate Credit
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: PSYC 51a or equivalent.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    PSYC 51A: Statistics
    Instructor: Wolf, Jutta
    Course Description: Statistics is used to find meaning in observations by collecting, summarizing, analyzing, and interpreting numerical information about subjects of interest, and it is used to make decisions that go beyond the observation. This course serves as an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Since this is a psychology course, techniques useful in the behavioral sciences will be emphasized. Students will learn the theory of statistical decisions, practical application of statistical software (SPSS), how to translate analyzed statistics into convincing written arguments, and how to evaluate presented statistics.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2188
    Fulfillment: SS, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: PSYC 10A or the permission of the instructor.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    PSYC 52A: Research Methods and Laboratory in Psychology
    Instructor: Wolf, Jutta
    Course Description: Psychology is the science of studying human behavior. Research Methods is a course designed to give you experience with designing, conducting, analyzing, interpreting, and communicating scientific psychological research. You will learn this through short presentations summarizing the necessary background, in-class exercises, and most importantly, through actual hands-on training on the fundamentals of conducting psychological research. The primary focus is “learning by doing.”
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2564
    Fulfillment: SS, QR, Writing Intensive
    Enrollment Limit: The emphasis of this course is learning research methods by doing research. This involves collecting and analyzing data and communicating the findings in a research paper format. This learning-by-doing approach will be more successful in smaller classes (<25 students).
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) and 51a.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    SOC 1A: Order and Change in Society
    Instructor: Barton, Rebecca
    Course Description: All online courses require a brief online orientation. Before you can enroll, you will need to email summersc@brandeis.edu to receive access to the online orientation in LATTE. Upon completion of the orientation, you will receive the code to enroll in the course. Have you ever wondered why our society is the way it is, or why people act in certain ways? Have you ever considered how individual lives are connected and influenced by larger social forces? In this course, you will enhance your critical thinking skills in ways that will challenge you to think through social phenomena and question your world. You will develop your “sociological imagination” through the introduction of new concepts, theories, and research about social worlds and the organization of social life. Topics include: socialization, culture, inequality and stratification. These topics will be discussed by looking at gender, race, and class in the U.S. context, though there are countless topics that can be analyzed through a sociological frame. With the sociological imagination in your analytical toolbox, the choice is yours.
    Session: Online Session
    Day:
    Time:
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2686
    Fulfillment: SS
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    THA 130A: Suzuki
    Instructor: Green, Brandon
    Course Description: Developed by the Japanese theater artist Tadashi Suzuki, the Suzuki method of acting training develops physical strength, stamina, and agility while engaging the imagination and will of the actor. Through a series of walks, statues, and marches, students are taught to breathe and move from the core of their bodies. This training allows students to act from physical impulse, resulting in a deep and personal experience of language and the world of play.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2196
    Fulfillment: PE-1, CA
    Enrollment Limit: 16
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    THA 15B-1: Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication
    Instructor: Cleary, Jennifer
    Course Description: All online courses require a brief online orientation. Before you can enroll, you will need to email summersc@brandeis.edu to receive access to the online orientation in LATTE. Upon completion of the orientation, you will receive the code to enroll in the course. Public speaking isn’t only about presenting a speech from behind a podium. This form of speaking is something this course will address and practice, but it is just a small part of what speaking in public is all about. In the course, we will define what “public” means, realizing that in all of our speaking engagements, whether personal or professional, we will always have an audience, whether it is an audience of one or one hundred. Public Speaking is a form of human communication, consisting of both talking and listening to an audience: it is a CONVERSATION. Much of the speaking we will do in life will NOT be from behind a podium. In this course, we will work on speaking for LIFE.
    Session: Online Session
    Day:
    Time:
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2200
    Fulfillment: OC
    Enrollment Limit: 10
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    THA 15B-2: Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication
    Instructor: Cleary, Jennifer
    Course Description: Public speaking isn’t only about presenting a speech from behind a podium. This form of speaking is something this course will address and practice, but it is just a small part of what speaking in public is all about. In the course, we will define what “public” means, realizing that in all of our speaking engagements, whether personal or professional, we will always have an audience, whether it is an audience of one or one hundred. Public Speaking is a form of human communication, consisting of both talking and listening to an audience: it is a CONVERSATION. Much of the speaking we will do in life will NOT be from behind a podium. In this course, we will work on speaking for LIFE.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2214
    Fulfillment: OC
    Enrollment Limit: 10
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    THA 15B-3: Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication
    Instructor: Jacobs, Alexander
    Course Description: This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of making presentations to groups of people. Students will explore the principles of human communication and apply them to various situations and forms of spoken discourse. This course offers students the opportunity to develop a process for analyzing the audience and situation; for choosing, limiting, and researching a subject; for developing effective habits of vocal delivery; and for writing their own speeches.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:30pm - 3:50pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2202
    Fulfillment: OC
    Enrollment Limit: 10
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites: Does not meet the requirements for the major or minor in Theater Arts. May not be used to satisfy the Creative Arts distribution requirement.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    THA 15B-4: Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication
    Instructor: Jacobs, Alexander
    Course Description: This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of making presentations to groups of people. Students will explore the principles of human communication and apply them to various situations and forms of spoken discourse. This course allows students to develop a process for analyzing the audience and situation; for choosing, limiting, and researching a subject; for developing effective habits of vocal delivery; and for writing their own speeches.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2204
    Fulfillment: OC
    Enrollment Limit: 10
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites: Does not meet the requirements for the major or minor in Theater Arts. May not be used to satisfy the Creative Arts distribution requirement.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    THA 71A: Playwriting
    Instructor: Coroniti, Joseph
    Course Description: All online courses require a brief online orientation. Before you can enroll, you will need to email summersc@brandeis.edu to receive access to the online orientation in LATTE. Upon completion of the orientation, you will receive the code to enroll in the course. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of playwriting. Attention will be given to dramatic structure, the development of character, and stage dialogue in this class. In addition to completing a number of playwriting exercises, students will write one ten-minute play and one one-act play. Work will be shared with the class and read aloud.
    Session: Online Session
    Day:
    Time:
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2198
    Fulfillment: Writing Intensive, CA
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: THA 10a or permission of the instructor. May not be taken for credit by students who took THA 104a in prior years.
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    UWS 25A: The Good, The Bad, and The Slimy: The Aliens of Science-Fiction
    Instructor: Eggebrecht, Paige
    Course Description: Aliens are a cultural archetype that actualize real xenophobia, racism, and sexism in a socially digestible cultural mode, science-fiction. Aliens can represent the abject female or intersex body, the dark-skinned Other, or the invading foreigner. By examining film productions and depictions of aliens in science-fiction, we can understand better how the dominant culture thinks of itself. Are the aliens benevolent visitors seeking to enlighten the human race? A terrifying and destructive invading force that uncomfortably reminds us of our own oppressive past? Or does the alien just remind us of our mother?This writing seminar will examine the various ways in which the Alien has been presented in science-fiction films. Students will view films including, but not limited to Earth vs. the Flying Saucers (1956), Alien (1979), Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977), E.T. (1982), Independence Day (1996), District 9 (2009) and Arrival (2016). Students will be asked to write three papers over the course of the session. The first will be a close reading essay which focuses on evidence and analysis of a film scene or character. The second is a “lens” essay in which students will use selections from Michel Foucault’s Discipline and Punish to interpret a film. The final essay is a research essay in which students will be expected to research and write on an alien film from outside of the primary films we watch in class. There is an enrollment llimit of 10 students to this class.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2701
    Fulfillment: UWS
    Enrollment Limit: 10
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    X
    UWS 37B: Border Crossings
    Instructor: Cavender, Kurt
    Course Description: This university writing seminar looks at treatments of emigration and immigration in classic and contemporary Hollywood cinema, particularly as they relate to concepts of borders, globalization, war, ethnic identity, and cultural assimilation. Not only do these films situate immigration as the central formative experience of American identity, they also offer a variety of models for negotiating the difficulties of passing back and forth between old worlds and new, between the past and the future. The experience of border crossing, as depicted in these films, challenges us to rethink our own concepts of the family, nation, race, and ethnicity, as well as our social and cultural attitudes towards difference and otherness. There is an enrollment llimit of 10 students to this class.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Location:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Class Number: 2722
    Fulfillment: UWS
    Enrollment Limit: 10 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,834 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites:
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link