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    DepartmentCourse NumberCourse NameClass NumberSessionDayTime
    ANTH116AHuman Osteology2028Session IIM, T, TH2:00pm - 4:40pm
    ANTH5AHuman Origins2027Session IIM, T, TH11:00am - 1:40pm
    BCHM88BIntroductory Biochemistry2029Session IIM, T, W, Th8:30am - 10:50am
    BIOL15BCells and Organisms2002Session IM, T, W, Th8:30am - 10:50am
    BIOL26APlant Biology2047Online SessionOnlineOnline
    BIOL42AHuman Physiology2003Session IM, T, W, Th8:30am - 10:50am
    BIOL42BHuman Physiology Lab2274Session IM, T, W, Th11:00am - 1:20pm
    BISC11ABiodiversity Connections2048Online SessionOnlineOnline
    CHEM11AGeneral Chemistry I2004Session IM, T, TH, F8:30am - 11:00am
    CHEM11BGeneral Chemistry II2030Session IIM, T, TH, F8:30am - 11:00am
    CHEM18AGeneral Chemistry Laboratory I2005Session IM, TH1:00pm - 5:30pm
    CHEM18BGeneral Chemistry Laboratory II2031Session IIM, TH1:00pm - 5:30pm
    CHEM25AOrganic Chemistry I2006Session IM, T, TH, F8:30am - 11:00am
    CHEM25BOrganic Chemistry II2032Session IIM, T, TH, F8:30am - 11:00am
    CHEM29AOrganic Chemistry Laboratory I2007Session IT, TH1:00pm - 5:30pm
    CHEM29BOrganic Chemistry Laboratory II2033Session IIT, TH1:00pm - 5:30pm
    COSI11AProgramming in Java2008Session IM, T, W, Th11:00am - 1:20pm
    COSI12BAdvanced Programming Techniques2034Session IIM, T, W, Th11:00am - 1:20pm
    COSI21AData Structures and the Fundamentals of Computing2009Session IM, T, W, Th8:30am - 10:50am
    ECON10AIntroduction to Microeconomics2010Session IM, T, TH11:00am - 1:40pm
    ECON171AFinancial Economics2035Session IM, T, TH8:00am - 10:40am
    ECON20AIntroduction to Macroeconomics2036Session IIM, T, TH6:30pm - 9:10pm
    ECON28BThe Global Economy2037Session IIM, T, TH2:00pm - 4:40pm
    ECON2AA Survey of Economics2038Session IIM, T, TH11:00am - 1:40pm
    ECON80AMicroeconomic Theory2011Session IM, T, TH2:00pm - 4:40pm
    ECON82BMacroeconomic Theory2012Session IM, T, TH6:30pm - 9:10pm
    ECON83AStatistics for Economic Analysis2282Session IIM, T, TH11:00am - 1:40pm
    ENG180AThe Modern American Short Story2039Session IIM, T, TH8:00am - 10:40am
    ENG21AYoung Adult Literature2013Session IM, T, TH8:00am - 10:40am
    ENG79AScreenwriting Workshop: Beginning Screenplay2014Session IM, T, TH2:00pm - 4:40pm
    FA165AContemporary Art2049Online SessionOnlineOnline
    FA178BSeminar on Chinese Calligraphy: History and Practice2057Session IIM, T, TH11:00am - 1:40pm
    FA3AIntroduction to Drawing I2015Session IM, T, TH6:30pm - 9:10pm
    HIST56BWorld History to 19602050Online SessionOnlineOnline
    HSSP114BRacial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care2300Session IIM, T, TH2:00pm - 4:40pm
    IGS10AIntroduction to International and Global Studies2016Session IM, T, TH11:00am - 1:40pm
    INT92GSummer Internship2051Online SessionOnlineOnline
    MATH10ATechniques of Calculus (a)2017Session IM, T, W, Th8:30am - 10:50am
    MATH10BTechniques of Calculus (b)2041Session IIM, T, W, Th2:00pm - 4:20pm
    MATH15AApplied Linear Algebra2018Session IM, T, W, Th2:00pm - 4:20pm
    MATH20AMulti-variable Calculus2042Session IIM, T, W, Th2:00pm - 4:20pm
    MATH36AProbability2043Session IIM, T, W, Th11:00am - 1:20pm
    MATH8AIntroduction to Probability and Statistics2019Session IM, T, W, Th11:00am - 1:20pm
    NPSY11BIntroduction to Behavioral Neuroscience2020Session IM, T, TH6:30pm - 9:10pm
    PHIL1AIntroduction to Philosophy2021Session IM, T, TH8:00am - 10:40am
    PHYS10AIntroduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena I2022Session IM, T, W, Th8:30am - 10:50am
    PHYS10BIntroduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena II2044Session IIM, T, W, Th8:30am - 10:50am
    PHYS18AIntroductory Physics Lab I2023Session IT, TH1:00pm - 5:00pm
    PHYS18BIntroductory Physics Lab II2045Session IIT, TH1:00pm - 5:00pm
    PSYC148AApplied Statistical Computing in R2053Online SessionOnlineOnline
    PSYC51AStatistics2024Session IM, T, TH8:00am - 10:40am
    PSYC52AResearch Methods and Laboratory in Psychology2046Session IIM, T, TH8:00am - 10:40am
    REL151AThe Buddha: His Life and Teachings2025Session IM, T, TH11:00am - 1:40pm
    SOC1AOrder and Change in Society2054Online SessionOnlineOnline
    THA130ASuzuki2026Session IM, T, TH11:00am - 1:40pm
    THA15B-1Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication2055Online SessionOnlineOnline
    THA15B-2Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication2056Online SessionOnlineOnline
    UWS28ADisney to DC Comics: A Study in Villainy2283Session IIM, T, TH11:00am - 1:40pm
    UWS38AA View From the Margins: Understanding Inequality in America2276Session IIM, T, TH2:00pm - 4:40pm
    X
    ANTH 116A: Human Osteology
    Instructor: Javier Urcid
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: This course reviews in detail human skeletal anatomy for the proper identification of the bones in the body, their biomechanical articulations and their relationship with the muscular system. Focus is then directed to studying forensic methods and techniques for the estimation of age at death, determination of sex, assessment of type of bone remodeling, identification of cultural modifications to bone, and of the impact of environmental processes on bony tissue. Hands-on laboratory sessions will involve team analysis of human remains from the comparative collection in the Archaeology Laboratory at Brandeis.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 2:00pm - 4:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2028
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS, SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ANTH 5A: Human Origins
    Instructor: Javier Urcid
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: This course covers the transformation of human physical and cultural endowments through a span of some 5 million years, from a hominoid stage and a foraging economy to the origins of agricultural practices and the rise of urban life. A consideration of humans’ place in nature as well as a review of evolutionary principles leads to discuss the archaeological findings of hominids in a diachronic framework. Further consideration is placed on the selective processes that led to the domestication of biomasses symbiotic with humans, and of the social causes and consequences of settled life. The journey through the bio-cultural transformations of humanity highlights the emergence of bipedal locomotion, the acquisition of language, changes in subsistence economies, and an increase in societal complexity.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2027
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    BCHM 88B: Introductory Biochemistry
    Instructor: Kene Piasta
    Prerequisites: One year organic chemistry with laboratory, BIOL 14A, and BIOL 15B. Does not meet the requirements for the major in biochemistry.
    Course Description: Topics include protein and nucleic acid structure; metabolism of biologically important compounds; formation and utilization of "energy-rich" compounds; introduction to enzyme mechanism; comparison of basic biochemical and chemical processes; and biochemical basis of disease.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2029
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    BIOL 15B: Cells and Organisms
    Instructor: Kene Piasta
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: Introduces contemporary biology with an emphasis on cells, organs, and organ systems. Topics include the forms and functions of macromolecules, organelles, and cells, the integration of cells into tissues, and the physiology of fundamental life processes. The course is intended to prepare students to understand the biology of everyday life, and to provide a strong foundation for those who continue to study the life sciences.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2002
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    BIOL 26A: Plant Biology
    Instructor: Melissa Kosinski-Collins
    Prerequisites: BIOL 14A and BIOL 15B. Students looking to take an online course should first visit: http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/registration/online-learning/online.html Here students will learn about the differences between in-person and online classes. You will also learn how you can enroll in a free, online, self-paced orientation to online learning that must be completed before you can receive a SAGE consent code is enroll in this class. Due to the popularity of online classes, you should not delay in completing the orientation and registering for this class. To maintain course quality, all online classes have limited enrollment.
    Course Description: This 10-week online course is designed for students who have taken BIOL 14A and BIOL 15B and are interested in learning the fundamentals of plant biology. The course is intended for students who are familiar with central dogma, structure-function relationship and genetic inheritance, but have not yet applied those concepts in plant systems. We will adopt a molecular and chemical approach as we explore various concepts in plant biology including plant metabolism, structure-function, development, genetics, pathology and taxonomy.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time: Online
    Credit Hours:
    Sage Class Number: 2047
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students - early enrollment is strongly advised
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    BIOL 42A: Human Physiology
    Instructor: Maria Miara
    Prerequisites: BIOL 14A and BIOL 15B. CHEM 25A and 25B are recommended.
    Course Description: Physiology, according to American Physiological Society, is the study of life, and how genes, cells, tissues, and organisms function. Physiologists are occupied with research on key physiological concepts of body systems function. The investigation of living systems at many levels includes molecular processes, cell function, and behavior of isolated tissues, organ systems and the whole organism. The physiologists work is not limited to cell and tissue culture and animal experiments but includes research in human subjects.  Physiological studies of normal function provide the basis to understanding abnormal function that occurs in pathological states. Physiologists are always trying to understand the functional body responses to a variety of internal and external environmental challenges.  In this context the physiology course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the function and regulation of organ systems and integration of all systems in the human body. In addition, the importance of mechanisms of communication and control/ regulation to integrate all organ systems to maintain the homeostasis will be emphasized. Course content will include principles of homeostasis, neural & hormonal control mechanisms, sensory systems, muscle physiology, bone physiology, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and metabolism, renal, endocrine, reproductive, and immune systems.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2003
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    BIOL 42B: Human Physiology Lab
    Instructor: Maria Miara
    Prerequisites: BIOL 42A. BIOL 42B may be taken concurrently with BIOL 42A.
    Course Description: This laboratory course is offered as an optional 2-credit add on to the lecture-based BIOL42A Human physiology course. Students will be introduced to laboratory techniques used to study human physiology including electromyography(EMG), electrycardiography(ECG), exhaled gas analysis, and spirometry. Students will set up equipment, make predictions, record results and analyze how their observations reveal physiological principles.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2274
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled:
    Enrollment Limit: 20 students due to limited lab space - early enrollment is strongly advised
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $1,957 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    BISC 11A: Biodiversity Connections
    Instructor: Colleen Hitchcock
    Prerequisites: Students looking to take an online course should first visit: http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/registration/online-learning/online.html Here students will learn about the differences between in-person and online classes. You will also learn how you can enroll in a free, online, self-paced orientation to online learning that must be completed before you can receive a SAGE consent code is enroll in this class. Due to the popularity of online classes, you should not delay in completing the orientation and registering for this class. To maintain course quality, all online classes have limited enrollment. Does not meet the requirements for the major in Biology.
    Course Description: The goal of this online course is to explore the evolution, extinction, and conservation of biodiversity for students not majoring in the sciences. Students leaving this course will have a firm grasp of the scientific method, the benefits and limitations of scientific conclusions and the interplay between science and society. In the online environment we will explore topics through a variety of formats to promote both instructor lead and peer facilitated learning. It is impossible to explore biodiversity without promoting bioliteracy of the flora and fauna local to students. This is course will introduce students to digital species identification tools and make use of iNaturalist (www.iNaturalist.org). iNaturalist is a worldwide citizen science platform that enables users to build naturalist skills and connect with a broader local community of naturalists while at the same time providing worldwide data on species distribution to the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (www.gbif.org). Given the online structure of this course and presumed varied geographic location of students, complementing our work with this citizen science experience will enable students to have a place-based experience and develop life-long naturalist skills. In addition, it will offer insight to non-majors in the type of science contributions they can make now and in the future.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time: Online
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2048
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit: 12 students - this limit is to maintain regular engagement online and in citizen science research. Early enrollment is strongly advised
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    CHEM 11A: General Chemistry I
    Instructor: Rebecca Meeks
    Prerequisites: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have passed CHEM 15a in previous years. The corresponding lab is CHEM 18a.
    Course Description: Covers a wide array of topics, embracing aspects of descriptive, as well as quantitative, chemistry. No prior study of chemistry is assumed, as the course begins by looking at the atomic foundation of matter, the elements, and the organization of the periodic table, working its way up to studying how atoms are bonded together to form larger units of matter. Students who complete this course will have an understanding of the three major phases of matter—solids, liquids, and gases—and how they behave, as well as a knowledge of the major types of chemical reactions and how to represent them. A strong focus is put on learning methods of creative problem-solving—using the material as a way to develop creative approaches to solving unfamiliar problems—a skill that carries students far beyond the confines of the classroom. Usually offered every year.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 8:30am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2004
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $0
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    CHEM 11B: General Chemistry II
    Instructor: Michael Vela
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 11a or an approved equivalent. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have passed CHEM 15b in previous years. The corresponding lab is CHEM 18b.
    Course Description: This course covers basic chemical principles, with examples drawn from the chemistry of living systems as well as from environmental chemistry and materials science. Topics covered include chemical equilibrium, acid/­base chemistry, kinetics, thermodynamics,electrochemistry, radioactivity and nuclear chemistry, and coordination chemistry. The combination of the two summer sessions covers the same material presented in CHEM 11A and CHEM 11B to all science majors during the academic year
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 8:30am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2030
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    CHEM 18A: General Chemistry Laboratory I
    Instructor: Rebecca Meeks
    Prerequisites: Corequisite: CHEM 11a
    Course Description: Chemistry 18A is the companion course to Chemistry 11A. It is designed so that the experiments follow the lecture topics giving students a hands-on way to help them understand the material they are learning. No prior experience in a laboratory setting is assumed, and instruction in the use of all equipment will be provided. This course will expose students to a wide range of laboratory techniques and concepts, beginning with basic measurements, pipetting, and an understanding of quantitative error. Students will also be introduced to computer data collection, analytical chemistry, qualitative analysis, and instrumental analysis.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, TH
    Time: 1:00pm - 5:30pm
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2005
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: This course does not fulfill any general university graduation requirements
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $1,957 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $125
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    CHEM 18B: General Chemistry Laboratory II
    Instructor: Michael Vela
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 18a and CHEM 11a. Corequisite: CHEM 11b.
    Course Description: This is the second semester of the general chemistry laboratory program. Continued use of probes interfaced with computers to monitor pH and electrical conductivity changes in titrating weak monoprotic and polyprotic amino acids, to monitor pressure changes as part of a kinetics study, and to monitor voltage changes of electrochemical cells with temperature so as to establish thermodynamic parameters for redox reactions. Also included is identification of unknowns based on selective precipitation.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, TH
    Time: 1:00pm - 5:30pm
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2031
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: This course does not fulfill any general university graduation requirements
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $1,957 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $125
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    CHEM 25A: Organic Chemistry I
    Instructor: Kristen Mascall
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 10b, 11b, 15b or the equivalent. The corresponding lab for this course is CHEM 29a.
    Course Description: Organic chemistry is the fascinating study of carbon-containing compounds. CHEM 25a is the first module of a two-semester course that introduces fundamental topics of structure, function, and reactivity of organic molecules. The course will explore how and why organic reactions occur. The significance of organic chemistry to biological systems, medicine, environmental science, and industry will be emphasized through current literature examples. A strong focus will be placed on developing proficiency in problem-solving – applying conceptual knowledge to derive a solution to an unfamiliar problem – a skill that extends beyond classroom use. This course meets the first half of the organic chemistry requirement for chemistry, biology, premedical, and pre-dental majors when taken in conjunction with the laboratory course CHEM 29a. It is also useful for individuals in the physical and life science fields who wish to gain a working knowledge of organic chemistry.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 8:30am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2006
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $0
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    CHEM 25B: Organic Chemistry II
    Instructor: Mustafa Yatin
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 25A or the equivalent.
    Course Description: CHEM 25B is a continuation of CHEM 25A. This course meets the second half of the organic chemistry requirement for chemistry, biology, premedical, and pre-dental majors when taken in conjunction with the laboratory course CHEM 29B. The course will build upon concepts of structure and reactivity from CHEM 25A. Much emphasis will be placed on the chemistry of carbonyl compounds, and other biologically relevant molecules such as carbohydrates. Organic compounds of chemical, medicinal, and biological interest will be examined through current literature examples. We will particularly emphasize the green chemistry principles in the context of organic reactions and experiments.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 8:30am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2032
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $0
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    CHEM 29A: Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
    Instructor: Kristen Mascall
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 18b or 19b or the equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 25a. Dropping CHEM 25a necessitates written permission from the lab instructor to continue with the lab. May yield half-course credit toward rate of work and graduation. Two semester hour credits.
    Course Description: The CHEM 29a laboratory course affords practical experience in the synthesis, isolation, and analysis of organic compounds. Various techniques are introduced, including extraction, distillation, chromatography, and crystallization. Modern methods such as microwave-accelerated organic synthesis will be introduced. Experimental procedures reported in current literature will be adapted in the lab to prepare molecules of biological significance. Spectroscopic methods are introduced as a means of analyzing compound structures.
    Session: Session I
    Day: T, TH
    Time: 1:00pm - 5:30pm
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2007
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: This course does not fulfill any general university graduation requirements
    Enrollment Limit: 64
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $1,957 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $125
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    CHEM 29B: Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
    Instructor: Mustafa Yatin
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 29A or the equivalent. Co-requisite: CHEM 25B. Dropping CHEM 25B necessitates written permission from the lab instructor to continue with the lab. May yield half-course credit toward rate of work and graduation. Two semester hour credits.
    Course Description: CHEM 29B is a continuation of CHEM 29A. The CHEM 29B course provides continuing experience in laboratory techniques of synthesis, isolation and purification of organic compounds. Experimental procedures reported in current literature are adapted in the lab to prepare molecules of biological significance. Modern methods such as microwave-accelerated organic synthesis are introduced. Spectroscopic methods are used to analyze compound identity and purity.
    Session: Session II
    Day: T, TH
    Time: 1:00pm - 5:30pm
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2033
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: This course does not fulfill any general university graduation requirements
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $1,957 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $125
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    COSI 11A: Programming in Java
    Instructor: Antonella DiLillo
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: The course is an introduction to the art and science of computer programming and related computer science principles. Through programming students will develop fundamental skills such as abstract reasoning and problem solving. Students will master programming techniques using the Java programming language, and will develop good program design methodology resulting in correct, robust, and maintainable programs.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2008
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $100
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    COSI 12B: Advanced Programming Techniques
    Instructor: Michael Golitsyn
    Prerequisites: COSI 11A or programming facility in Java or C.
    Course Description: The course will introduce students to object oriented programming using Java. It will focus on more sophisticated features such as design of classes, interfaces, packages, and APIs. It will also cover the basic principles of software design, testing and collaborative programming. Upon completion of this class, students will be able to understand the concept of object-oriented programming (OOP) as well as the purpose and usage of inheritance, polymorphism, encapsulation and method overloading. They will be able to create Java application programs using sound OOP practices (e.g., interfaces and APIs) and proper program structuring. Finally, they will be able to develop programs using the Java Collection API as well as the Java standard class library.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2034
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $100
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    COSI 21A: Data Structures and the Fundamentals of Computing
    Instructor: Antonella DiLillo
    Prerequisites: COSI 11a and either COSI 12b or permission from the Undergraduate Advising Head or Graduate Program Director.
    Course Description: This course focuses on the design and analysis of algorithms and the use of data structures.Through the introduction of the most widely used data structures employed in solving commonly encountered problems (e.g. lists, trees, and graphs), students will learn different ways to organize data for easy access and efficient manipulation. Algorithms to solve classic problems (e.g. searching, sorting, hashing, graph algorithms, etc.) will be presented, as well as classic algorithm design strategies (e.g. divide-and-conquer and greedy algorithms). Computational complexity theory will be introduced for studying the efficiency of the algorithms covered in the course.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2009
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $100
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 10A: Introduction to Microeconomics
    Instructor: Hyongse Yoo
    Prerequisites: Intended for Economics majors and minors or students who intend to take more than one Economics course. Students who have taken ECON 2a and received a B+ or better cannot receive credit for this course. May not be taken for credit by students concurrently with or after they have taken ECON 80a.
    Course Description: The objective of this course is to develop economic reasoning skills of students who have not met the economic approach before, through several basic economic concepts. This course will cover consumer choice, firm choice, market equilibrium, and several derivatives of these topics, such as choice under uncertainty, choice between labor and leisure, monopoly, and game theory. One of the core methods to solve economic problem these days is the mathematical approach. So we will learn how to set the optimization problem and how to solve it, using basic calculus. However, in this course, the main focus of the lecture would be put on developing ‘economic mind’ of students.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2010
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: QR, SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 171A: Financial Economics
    Instructor: Anne Laski
    Prerequisites: ECON 80a and ECON 83a or permission of the instructor.
    Course Description: The course covers topics related to financial economics, including investors’ attitudes toward risk, capital allocation, portfolio selection, asset pricing models (Capital Asset Pricing Model and Arbitrage Pricing Theory), the efficient market hypothesis, fixed income markets, equity valuation, and options and futures markets. Lectures will consist of covering the theory, going over in-class examples, and class discussion. Problem sets will focus on applying the material from lectures. Students will also be required to complete a session project. Students should have a basic understanding of microeconomics, statistics, and algebra. If you are enrolling in an upper-level Economics course this summer, please contact Leslie Yancich, the ECON Department administrator, lesliey@brandeis.edu, for an enrollment code. Permission to waive the ECON 83A is contingent upon students’ writing and passing an entrance exam in statistics prior the beginning of classes.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:00am - 10:40am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2035
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 20A: Introduction to Macroeconomics
    Instructor: Mohammed AlMehdar
    Prerequisites: ECON 10a or ECON 2a with a grade of B+ or higher. May not be taken for credit by students concurrently with or after they have taken ECON 82b.
    Course Description: Introduces the field of macroeconomics. Macroeconomics is the study of the overall or aggregate economic performance of national economies. Special emphasis will be placed on relating theoretical economics to critically analyzing real life phenomena, and understanding the use and limitations of different models.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 6:30pm - 9:10pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2036
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 28B: The Global Economy
    Instructor: Wei Jia
    Prerequisites: ECON 2a or ECON 10a and ECON 20a. ECON 20a may be taken concurrently with ECON 28b.
    Course Description: This course examines the causes and effects of international flows of goods, services, labor, and capital. The course considers both the microeconomic and macroeconomic effects of international transactions. In the microeconomics portion of the course, we will consider a number of economic models of international trade in goods and services. We will talk about comparative advantage, the Heckscher-Ohlin model, several types of trade policies, and international factor movement. In the macroeconomic portion of the course, we begin with the balance of payments accounts and what is meant by a balance of payments surplus or deficit. We then look at the factors that influence exchange rates, both in the short run and in the long run. We will also talk about the effects of international lending and recent financial crises associated with such lending. If you are enrolling in an upper-level Economics course this summer, please contact Leslie Yancich, the ECON Department administrator, lesliey@brandeis.edu, for an enrollment code.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 2:00pm - 4:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2037
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit: 50 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 2A: A Survey of Economics
    Instructor: Yaxuan Wen
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: This course is a survey of the field of Economics. It is intended for students who are not Economics majors or minors and may not be taken for credit by students who took ECON 10a in prior years. The course will: provide you an idea of the range of behaviors that economists investigate, introduce you to the basic tools to analyze economic behavior, and apply these tools to public policy issues. You will be introduced to the “economic way of thinking,” an approach to decision making that applies to personal decisions, to the decisions of businesses, labor unions and other organizations, and to the larger choices that society faces. This course has two broad goals. First, it is hoped that students can use basic economic principles to critically evaluate the arguments for and against public policy proposals after this course. Second, for those students who eventually choose to take further economics courses, this course should prepare them well, so that they have the theoretical tools and knowledge of economic terminology to be successful.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2038
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 80A: Microeconomic Theory
    Instructor: Hyongse Yoo
    Prerequisites: ECON 10a. Students must earn C- or higher in MATH 10a, or otherwise satisfy the calculus requirement, to enroll in this course.
    Course Description: The objective of this course is to develop intermediate level microeconomic knowledge and problem-solving skills. Core concepts and contents are similar to those of ECON 10A ‘Introduction to Microeconomics’, the beginner’s level microeconomics class. But the way topics are dealt with are more mathematical and the focus is more on problem-solving skills. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to apply mathematical skills to real world problems. If you are enrolling in an upper-level Economics course this summer, please contact Leslie Yancich, the ECON Department administrator, lesliey@brandeis.edu, for a enrollment code.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 2:00pm - 4:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2011
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 82B: Macroeconomic Theory
    Instructor: Mohammed AlMehdar
    Prerequisites: ECON 20a. Students must earn C- or higher in MATH 10a, or otherwise satisfy the calculus requirement, to enroll in this course.
    Course Description: Models of the determination of economic aggregates, such as national income, consumption, investment, government spending, exports, imports, and international capital flows, and economy-wide variables, such as the interest rate, the exchange rate, the price level and inflation, and the unemployment rate. The influence of fiscal and monetary policies on these aggregates and variables is examined. If you are enrolling in an upper-level Economics course this summer, please contact Leslie Yancich, the ECON Department administrator, lesliey@brandeis.edu, for a enrollment code.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 6:30pm - 9:10pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2012
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 83A: Statistics for Economic Analysis
    Instructor: Mengnan Zhu
    Prerequisites: ECON 2a or 10a. Students must earn C- or higher in MATH 10a, or otherwise satisfy the calculus requirement, to enroll in this course.
    Course Description: A first course in statistical inference. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, normal and binomial distributions, sampling distributions, point and interval estimation, properties of estimators, hypothesis testing, regression, and analysis of variance. If you are enrolling in an upper-level Economics course this summer, please contact Leslie Yancich, the ECON Department administrator, lesliey@brandeis.edu, for a enrollment code.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2282
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ENG 180A: The Modern American Short Story
    Instructor: William Flesch
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: This is a course on reading American short stories, mainly stories less than twenty pages long, some only a page long, though we may occasionally do longer ones. We'll do two or three stories per class (since these are longer summer school classes). We'll definitely do stories by Poe, Hemingway, Flannery O'Connor, J.D. Salinger, and Joy Williams, but most of the syllabus will be based on student interest and desire. In the past we've done detective fiction, magical realism, science fiction -- whatever is worth thinking about at length. Summer gives us maximum flexibility in what we read, and the course aims to be be serious fun.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:00am - 10:40am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2039
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: HUM
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Available for Graduate Credit
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ENG 21A: Young Adult Literature
    Instructor: William Flesch
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: Young readers want the most from literature -- from fiction, especially. They want the most basic pleasures that literature offers, and they want literature about the most basic human experiences: experiences of love and loss. So successful Young Adult literature has to be fun to read, surprising, and deep. It addresses the high drama of childhood and of adulthood at the same time. In this course we take YA literature very seriously, both in itself -- what is genuinely great about the work of J.K. Rowling or Suzanne Collins or Philip Pullman or Lois Lowry? -- and as a perfect example of how literature works, in particular what makes narrative powerful. Like myth, Young Adult literature brings us to the most elemental aspects of literary experience, and it does that in the most compelling and interesting way. It takes the experiences of young adults as seriously as they should be taken, and offers joy and consolation to its audience. And good Young Adult fiction is a sheer pleasure to read and to talk about. So this is a serious course which is also fun. When this course is taught in the summer, we start out with a basic syllabus, which includes some of the writers mentioned above (we might read The Giver, or Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, some of Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy, and The Hunger Games, as well as some Robert Louis Stevenson or Lewis Carroll), but we work out the rest of the reading the first day of class, based on student interest and desire -- in one previous class we did Stephen Chbosky's The Perks of Being a Wallflower, because students wanted to read it; in another we read Michael Grant's Gone; in a third we read Lemony Snicket. These are examples of the kinds of things we can work out the first day of class. Summer classes are very flexible, and that flexibility is ideal for this class.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:00am - 10:40am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2013
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: HUM
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ENG 79A: Screenwriting Workshop: Beginning Screenplay
    Instructor: Marc Weinberg
    Prerequisites: This course may not be repeated by students who have taken ENG 129b in previous years. Offered exclusively on a credit/no credit basis.
    Course Description: There's never been a better time to become a screenwriter. Breakthroughs in technology, production, and distribution have heightened the demand for good scripts. Whether you want to write a micro-budget indie or a Hollywood blockbuster, this course provides all the essential tools you’ll need. Learn the fundamentals – structure, story arc, character development – and develop the first act of your feature screenplay. You’ll also watch and analyze recent movies. Join us for a creative, low-pressure course over five weeks, and you’ll never look at a movie the same way again!
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 2:00pm - 4:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2014
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: HUM, WI
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    FA 165A: Contemporary Art
    Instructor: Peter Kalb
    Prerequisites: Students looking to take an online course should first visit: http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/registration/online-learning/online.html Here students will learn about the differences between in-person and online classes. You will also learn how you can enroll in a free, online, self-paced orientation to online learning that must be completed before you can receive a SAGE consent code is enroll in this class. Due to the popularity of online classes, you should not delay in completing the orientation and registering for this class. To maintain course quality, all online classes have limited enrollment. May not be taken for credit by students who took FA 152a in prior years.
    Course Description: This course addresses art at the turn of the 20th century with attention to intersections of art and identity, politics, economy, and history. It will begin with discussions of art in the United States as New York City established itself as the capital of contemporary art and then move to consider art communities around the world that have become prominent as the art world, like politics and the economy, have become increasingly globalized.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time: Online
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2049
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: CA
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students - early enrollment is strongly advised
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    FA 178B: Seminar on Chinese Calligraphy: History and Practice
    Instructor: Aida Wong
    Prerequisites: Some knowledge of reading Chinese. May not be taken for credit by students who took FA 191a in prior years.
    Course Description: This seminar examines the art and history of Chinese calligraphy. The goal is to introduce students of different Chinese-language levels (not limited to native-speakers) to canonical works of calligraphy as well as the enthusiasm and creativity these works have generated through the ages. From anonymous oracle bones and stone inscriptions to famed masterpieces, such as Wang Xizhi’s “Lanting Pavilion Preface,” and from original renderings to copies of others’ compositions, this course showcases the kaleidoscopic range that makes calligraphy a visual-linguistic art form beyond “words.” The multifaceted functions of stylized writing—such as for political, religious, and expressive purposes—will also be explored.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2057
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: NW, CA
    Enrollment Limit: 12 students - early enrollment is strongly advised
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $100
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    FA 3A: Introduction to Drawing I
    Instructor: Alfredo Gisholt
    Prerequisites: Beginning-level course. No previous drawing experience necessary. May be repeated once for credit if taught by different instructors.
    Course Description: This course will investigate various methods and subjects of drawing. Through a solid understanding of its form and principles, students will be encouraged to instigate intuitive and open responses to perceptual and conceptual sources. Students will be expected to address the role of drawing as part of their creative process.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 6:30pm - 9:10pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2015
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: CA
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $75
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    HIST 56B: World History to 1960
    Instructor: Marlyn Miller
    Prerequisites: Students looking to take an online course should first visit: http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/registration/online-learning/online.html Here students will learn about the differences between in-person and online classes. You will also learn how you can enroll in a free, online, self-paced orientation to online learning that must be completed before you can receive a SAGE consent code is enroll in this class. Due to the popularity of online classes, you should not delay in completing the orientation and registering for this class. To maintain course quality, all online classes have limited enrollment.
    Course Description: In this course we will look at the history of the world from 1450 to 1960 through the words, images, and artifacts produced by and about historical actors, and seek to understand the connections developed between peoples and societies through the creation of worldwide networks of economic and cultural exchange, the rise of modern political systems and industry, and the experience of colonialism, imperialism, and resistance. We will also seek to understand changes in religious and philosophical systems, the construction of race and gender, and the environment in response to these developments. As an online course, we will be combining traditional and new media to create an experiential, stimulating space for learning .
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time: Online
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2050
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS, NW
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students - early enrollment is strongly advised
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    HSSP 114B: Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care
    Instructor: Jessica Santos
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: The environments where we live, learn, work, play, and pray shape our day-to-day lives and long-term health and wellbeing in complex ways. Dr. Anthony Iton, Senior Vice President for Healthy Communities at the California Endowment, famously said “tell me your zip code and I’ll tell you your life expectancy.” This course lays a theoretical and empirical foundation for students interested in understanding how social factors (poverty, community context, work environments, etc.) affect the health and wellbeing of racial and ethnic minorities and other vulnerable populations in the United States. Students will develop tools to analyze epidemiological patterns of health status by race/ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic status. In addition, students will learn how structural factors (racism, segregation, gender hierarchies, dominant cultural norms within health systems and organizations, and their intersections) contribute to health disparities, and how policies and practices inside and outside of the healthcare system are advancing health equity.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 2:00pm - 4:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2300
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $0
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    IGS 10A: Introduction to International and Global Studies
    Instructor: Chandler Rosenberger
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: "Globalization" touches us more every day. This class introduces students to the historical origins of globalization, then addresses the challenges of globalization to national and international governance, economic success, individual and group identities, cultural diversity, and the environment.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2016
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    INT 92G: Summer Internship
    Instructor: Alyssa Stalsberg Canelli
    Prerequisites: To register for INT 92G, please visit: https://www.brandeis.edu/summer/registration/brandeis-students/int-92g.html to learn about the registration process.
    Course Description: The purpose of this course is to help students to think critically about the organization and industry in which they are currently interning, while developing and articulating their personal narrative. Students will use their assignments and reflections to analyze their internship experience and articulate their academic, professional and personal goals, motivations and values. Through this process, students build their own meta-awareness about their learning process and how to extend it in the future. Students will also benefit from the collective learning of their peers. The activities and assignments for this course have been developed using active and reflective learning in order to help students maximize their internship experience. Assignments include: reflective activity reports, informational interviews, reading reflections, phone conversations with the instructor and a cumulative reflection.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time: Online
    Credit Hours: 1 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2051
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled:
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $450 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    MATH 10A: Techniques of Calculus (a)
    Instructor: Anurag Rao
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade of C- or higher in MATH 5a or placement by examination. Students may not take MATH 10a if they have received a satisfactory grade in MATH 10b or MATH 20a.
    Course Description: Introduction to differential (and some integral) calculus of one variable, with emphasis on techniques and applications.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2017
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    MATH 10B: Techniques of Calculus (b)
    Instructor: Yu Xin
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade of C- or higher in MATH 10a or placement by examination. Continuation of 10a. Students may not take MATH 10a and MATH 10b simultaneously. Students may not take MATH 10b if they have received a satisfactory grade in MATH 20a.
    Course Description: Introduction to integral calculus of one variable with emphasis on techniques and applications.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 2:00pm - 4:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2041
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    MATH 15A: Applied Linear Algebra
    Instructor: Jonathan Rachowicz
    Prerequisites: MATH 5a and permission of the instructor, placement by examination, or any mathematics course numbered 10 or above. Students may take MATH 15a or 22a for credit, but not both.
    Course Description: Topics include matrices, determinants, linear equations, vector spaces, eigenvalues, quadratic forms, linear programming. Emphasis on techniques and applications.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 2:00pm - 4:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2018
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $0
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    MATH 20A: Multi-variable Calculus
    Instructor: Langte Ma
    Prerequisites: MATH 10a and b or placement by examination. Students may take MATH 20a or 22b for credit, but not both. Students may not take MATH 10a or 10b concurrently with MATH 20a.
    Course Description: Among the topics treated are vectors and vector-valued functions, partial derivatives and multiple integrals, extremum problems, line and surface integrals, Green's and Stokes's theorems. Emphasis on techniques and applications.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 2:00pm - 4:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2042
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    MATH 36A: Probability
    Instructor: Eric Hanson
    Prerequisites: MATH 20a or 22b.
    Course Description: Topics include sample spaces and probability measures, elementary combinatorial examples. Conditional probability. Random variables, expectations, variance, distribution and density functions. Independence and correlation. Chebychev's inequality and the weak law of large numbers. Central limit theorem. Markov and Poisson processes.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2043
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    MATH 8A: Introduction to Probability and Statistics
    Instructor: Tarakaram Gollamudi
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: Topics include discrete probability spaces, random variables, expectation, variance, approximation by the normal curve, sample mean and variance, and confidence intervals. Does not require calculus; only high school algebra and graphing of functions.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2019
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    NPSY 11B: Introduction to Behavioral Neuroscience
    Instructor: Jason Pipkin
    Prerequisites: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) or MATH 10a or permission of the instructor.
    Course Description: In this course, we study the basics of neuroscience from single cells to sensory and motor systems to the neural basis of animal behavior and how the brain breaks down in various disorders and diseases. How does the brain talk to the body? How is visual information transformed from the eye to the brain? How does learning and memory work? This course is taught from a biological perspective (we consider cells, circuits of neurons, and regions of the brain) but no specific biological knowledge is prerequisite. Evaluation is via three exams and textbook is suggested.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 6:30pm - 9:10pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2020
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS, SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    PHIL 1A: Introduction to Philosophy
    Instructor: Berislav Marusic
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: This course will offer a problem-based introduction to philosophy. We will consider the following philosophical questions: What can we know about the world external to our senses? What can we know about the thoughts and feelings of others? What is the relationship between our minds and our brains? What makes certain sounds and inscriptions meaningful, while most other sounds and inscriptions are not? Can we have free will in a causally determined world governed by natural laws? What makes an action right or wrong? What does justice require of us? What is the evil of death? What is the meaning of life? The course aims to motivate these questions and introduce students to the methods of contemporary analytic philosophy.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:00am - 10:40am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2021
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: HUM
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    PHYS 10A: Introduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena I
    Instructor: Edward Martens
    Prerequisites: MATH 10a or equivalent. Usually taken with PHYS 18a.
    Course Description: This course is an introduction to Newtonian mechanics, kinetic theory, and thermodynamics.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2022
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    PHYS 10B: Introduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena II
    Instructor: Edward Martens
    Prerequisites: PHYS 10a. Usually taken with PHYS 18b.
    Course Description: This course is an introduction to electricity and magnetism, and optics. We will also explore special theory of relativity, and the structure of the atom.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2044
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    PHYS 18A: Introductory Physics Lab I
    Instructor: Peter Mistark
    Prerequisites: Corequisite: PHYS 10a
    Course Description: Physics 18A/B is a unique laboratory course that sits at the intersection between physics and biology. The focus of the lab is to the study of motion at the microscopic scale. This scale represents the world in which single celled organisms live. Understanding physics at this level is essential to understanding how and why biological systems work. Students will learn how to preform basic laboratory protocols. They will also make use standard physics theories to make predictions as to how a real system will behave. The predictions will be confirmed via laboratory measurements. Students will also have the opportunity to design their own experiment and present their finding to the class.
    Session: Session I
    Day: T, TH
    Time: 1:00pm - 5:00pm
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2023
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled:
    Enrollment Limit: 20 students due to limited space in the lab. Early enrollment is strongly advised.
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $1,957 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $50
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    PHYS 18B: Introductory Physics Lab II
    Instructor: Peter Mistark
    Prerequisites: Corequisite: PHYS 10b.
    Course Description: Physics 18A/B is a unique laboratory course that sits at the intersection between physics and biology. The focus of the lab is to the study of motion at the microscopic scale. This scale represents the world in which single celled organisms live. Understanding physics at this level is essential to understanding how and why biological systems work. Students will learn how to preform basic laboratory protocols. They will also make use standard physics theories to make predictions as to how a real system will behave. The predictions will be confirmed via laboratory measurements. Students will also have the opportunity to design their own experiment and present their finding to the class.
    Session: Session II
    Day: T, TH
    Time: 1:00pm - 5:00pm
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2045
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled:
    Enrollment Limit: 20 students due to limited space in the lab. Early enrollment is strongly advised.
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $1,957 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $50
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    PSYC 148A: Applied Statistical Computing in R
    Instructor: Xiaodong Liu
    Prerequisites: PSYC 51a or equivalent. Students looking to take an online course should first visit: http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/registration/online-learning/online.html Here students will learn about the differences between in-person and online classes. You will also learn how you can enroll in a free, online, self-paced orientation to online learning that must be completed before you can receive a SAGE consent code is enroll in this class. Due to the popularity of online classes, you should not delay in completing the orientation and registering for this class. To maintain course quality, all online classes have limited enrollment.
    Course Description: This course is designed for students who would like to learn to do statistical computing/programming in R and for students with introductory statistics background who would like to further their understanding of statistical modeling and its application in applied and academic research. R is the platform for this course. It will be introduced in a way that helps make the connection between statistical concepts, modeling, and their implementation. In addition, through R programming, students will learn to document the analytic process for reproducibility of research work. Topics of statistical computing include methods of describing data, numerical summary and graphical presentation of data, computing of probability, density, and quantiles based on given distributions (including Gaussian distribution, t-distribution, F-distribution, Chi-square distribution, and/or binomial distribution), simulation and data generation, and writing functions for custom statistics. While the main theme of this course is on statistical computing with R, we will emphasize the applied aspect through using data from empirical studies.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time: Online
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2053
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS, QR
    Enrollment Limit: 10 students - early enrollment is strongly advised
    Course Classification: Available for Graduate Credit
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    PSYC 51A: Statistics
    Instructor: Jutta Wolf
    Prerequisites: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) or the permission of the instructor. This course normally should be completed by the end of the sophomore year.
    Course Description: This course serves as an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Statistics is used to find meaning in observations by collecting, summarizing, analyzing, and interpreting numerical information about subjects of interest, and it is used to make decisions that go beyond the observation. Since this is a psychology course, techniques useful in the behavioral sciences will be emphasized. Students will learn the theory of statistical decisions, practical application of statistical software (SPSS), how to translate analyzed statistics into convincing written arguments, and how to evaluate presented statistics. In more detail, topics of the course include methods for describing data, normal, t-, ?2-, and F- distributions, hypothesis testing, simple correlation and regression analysis, and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Data and examples from empirical studies will be used to elaborate on when an analytic method is appropriate and how the method can help address the research questions or test the research hypotheses. Students will have ample opportunities to practice using each method through take-home assignments, in-class exercises, examinations, and SPSS reports. Students will receive extensive instruction in the use of SPSS.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:00am - 10:40am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2024
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    PSYC 52A: Research Methods and Laboratory in Psychology
    Instructor: Jutta Wolf
    Prerequisites: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) and 51a. In order to pre-enroll in this course, students must consult with the department one semester before anticipated enrollment. This course normally should be completed by the end of the sophomore year.
    Course Description: Psychology is the science of studying human behaviour. Research Methods is a course designed to give you experience with designing, conducting, analyzing, interpreting, and communicating scientific psychological research. You will learn this through short presentations summarizing the necessary background, in-class exercises, and most importantly, through actual hands-on training on the fundamentals of conducting psychological research. The primary focus is “learning by doing.”
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:00am - 10:40am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2046
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS, QR, WI
    Enrollment Limit: 20 students. Early enrollment is strongly advised.
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    REL 151A: The Buddha: His Life and Teachings
    Instructor: Yu Feng
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: This course is an introduction to Buddhism, one of the major religions of the world. Founded by Siddgartha Gautama or the Buddha in 6th century B.C., Buddhism has spread from South Asia to other parts of Asia into a great variety of distinctive schools of thoughts. Although at the present world Asia is still the place with the greatest Buddhist population, Buddhism has also expanded to Europe and America as well. The term “Buddhism” refers to a vast and complex religious and philosophical tradition with a history that stretches over some 2,500 years. As for living Buddhism, it divides, conventionally, into three major traditions: First, the Theravada tradition of Sri Lank and South-East Asia; second, the Mahayana tradition of China (proper), Korea, and Japan; and third, Tibetan Buddhism. While this course will take all the three traditions into account, we shall, however, focus on the Mahayana tradition.This course will be a combination of a series of lectures and seminar style discussions based on intensive readings, mainly, the English translation of the original Sanskrit, Chinese, or Japanese materials. The course will have the following five units:Unit One: Buddha and early Indian BuddhismLecture Topics: • Timeline of the Development of Buddhism• The Ancient Indian Society and the Caste System• Religious Ideas Prior to Buddhism• The Life of BuddhaReadings: • Four Noble Truths (on-line)• Eight Fold Path (on-line)• The Birth of the Holy One (on-line)• Tales of Buddha (on-line)• Buddhist Precepts and Codes (on-line)Unit Two: Mahayana BuddhismLecture Topics:• What is Mahayana Buddhism?• What is the difference between a Buddha and a Bodhisattva?• What are the differences between the “conventional truth” and the “ultimate truth”?• What is meant by the Sunya or Emptiness?• What is the significance of the concept of cause and effect in the Mahayana philosophy?Readings:• The Heart Sutra (on-line)• The Middle Way of Nagarjuna (Textbook Pp26-34)• Examination of Nirvana by Nagarjuna (on-line)• The Emptiness of Unreal by Monk Zhao (on-line)• The Eight Consciousness by Vasubandhu (Textbook Pp35-46)Unit Three: Zen (Chan) BuddhismLecture Topics: • From Bodhidharma to the Six Patriarch, the Development of Zen Buddhism• Does Everyone have a Buddha Nature?• From Gradual Enlightenment to Sudden Enlightenment• The Role of Meditation• The Crazy ZenReadings:• Platform Sutra Chapters 1-4, 10• Zen Case Study: Brick and Cart• Zen Case Study: Bridge and Lady• Zen Case Study: Buddha and Cow Manure• Zen Case Study: Devil Wrote the Scriptures• Zen Case Study: Eating and Sleeping• Zen Case Study: Choose to Go Down to Hell• Zen Case Study: Hit with Stick• Zen Case Study: Killing the Cat• Zen Case Study: Rain and the Umbrella • Zen Case Study: Red Fox• Zen Case Study: Water and CupUnit Four: Buddhist Rituals and ArtsIn this Unit, the instructor and course assistants will introduce the fundamental knowledge of mudras, statues, dress styles of monks and nuns, and other Buddhist symbols. There will be a visual recognition test.Unit Five: The Humanistic BuddhismThis unit will discuss the modern development of Buddhism with emphasis on the Humanistic Buddhism headquartered in Taiwan.Readings:• Sutra of the Vow of Kstigarbha Bodhisattva (on-line)• The Human Centered Buddhism by Master Yinshun (on-line)
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2025
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: HUM, NW
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Available for Graduate Credit
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    SOC 1A: Order and Change in Society
    Instructor: Sarah Halford
    Prerequisites: Students looking to take an online course should first visit: http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/registration/online-learning/online.html Here students will learn about the differences between in-person and online classes. You will also learn how you can enroll in a free, online, self-paced orientation to online learning that must be completed before you can receive a SAGE consent code is enroll in this class. Due to the popularity of online classes, you should not delay in completing the orientation and registering for this class. To maintain course quality, all online classes have limited enrollment.
    Course Description: In this course, you will enhance your critical thinking skills in ways that will challenge you to think through social phenomena and question the world around you. We will explore sociology as a “social science” by focusing on the key methodological and conceptual tools that sociologists use and by looking closely at recent books and articles written by sociologists. We will address questions about how and why society is organized as it is, how our lives are shaped by broader social forces (that we often do not see), and how aspects of our lives and biographies structure our experiences.Course materials are designed to show you how sociologists approach the world and to give you the opportunity to develop what C. Wright Mills calls the “sociological imagination.” Together, we will discuss and read about social worlds and the organization of social life. Topics include: socialization, culture, inequality and stratification. These topics will be discussed by looking at culture, gender, race, class, religion, and social movements in the U.S. context. Because this is an online course, we will discuss the readings and interact with one another virtually. This will require active participation and thoughtful consideration of your peers’ contributions, and it will be graded just as it would be in a physical classroom. You will be expected to post your questions about the readings to the online discussion forum on a weekly basis and respond to your classmates. Throughout the semester, you will also submit three memos, 3-4 pages in length, that discuss the themes and concepts from that week’s readings. At the end of the semester, you will submit a final paper in which you will write a “sociological autobiography.” In it, you will describe the intersection between your biography and history using your “sociological imagination.” Your goals for this essay are to demonstrate sociological understanding, describe and connect course readings and concepts, and practice your academic writing. Each week, I will post brief video and/or written lectures that will address and clarify the arguments and sociological concepts presented in the course readings. From time to time, I will post videos, podcasts, photographs, and/or other types of media that relate to themes from that week’s readings. I will also respond to your memos, mediate conversations in the forums when necessary, and make myself available by email to clarify your questions. By the end of the summer you should be able to: 1. Describe how sociologists conceive of questions and problems using your “sociological imagination” 2. Demonstrate understanding of core sociological concepts and research methods 3. Define social structure and analyze how structural forces shape people’s daily experiences and opportunities in patterned ways 4. Apply key sociological concepts to everyday life 5. Better articulate how your own experiences in the world - including your successes and failures - have been shaped by your social context 6. Present and analyze data about inequalities based on gender, race, class, and sexuality in the contemporary US and describe how they are evident in particular case studies. 7. Nurture norms of careful listening, open discourse, and civic respect.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time: Online
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2054
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students - early enrollment is strongly advised
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    THA 130A: Suzuki
    Instructor: Alexander Jacobs
    Prerequisites: Counts as one activity course toward the physical education requirement. Undergraduates may repeat this course twice for credit, once with each instructor.
    Course Description: Counts as one activity course toward the physical education requirement. Undergraduates may repeat this course twice for credit, once with each instructor.Developed by the Japanese theater artist Tadashi Suzuki, the Suzuki method of acting training develops physical strength, stamina, and agility while engaging the imagination and will of the actor. Through a series of walks, statues, and marches, students are taught to breathe and move from the core of their bodies. This training allows students to act from physical impulse, resulting in a deep and personal experience of language and the world of play. Usually offered every semester.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2026
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: PE-1, CA
    Enrollment Limit: 16 students. This is a performance based class and in order to give stage time to each student enrollment is limited. Early enrollment is strongly advised
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    THA 15B-1: Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication
    Instructor: Jennifer Cleary
    Prerequisites: Does not meet the requirements for the major or minor in Theater Arts. May not be used to satisfy the Creative Arts distribution requirement. Students looking to take an online course should first visit: http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/registration/online-learning/online.html Here students will learn about the differences between in-person and online classes. You will also learn how you can enroll in a free, online, self-paced orientation to online learning that must be completed before you can receive a SAGE consent code is enroll in this class. Due to the popularity of online classes, you should not delay in completing the orientation and registering for this class. To maintain course quality, all online classes have limited enrollment.
    Course Description: Public Speaking is an often-misunderstood form of communication consisting of both talking with and listening to an audience: it is a conversation. In this course, students will engage with public speaking skills and experiences through recorded and live video presentation. The overall course goals are for students to feel comfortable, confident, and prepared to succeed in a variety of speaking situations, to learn how to speak comfortably and effectively on video (both live and recorded), and to manage any fears of public speaking through practice, discussion, and collegial support/feedback. The course is structured to allow for students to enjoy speaking, to build a caring online learning community, and to learn from each other. This course is crafted as an online lab in speaking and listening. Students will be evaluated on their contributions to the collective learning community as well as on their own individual progress.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time: Online
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2055
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: OC
    Enrollment Limit: 10 students - early enrollment is strongly advised
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    THA 15B-2: Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication
    Instructor: Jennifer Cleary
    Prerequisites: Does not meet the requirements for the major or minor in Theater Arts. May not be used to satisfy the Creative Arts distribution requirement. Students looking to take an online course should first visit: http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/registration/online-learning/online.html Here students will learn about the differences between in-person and online classes. You will also learn how you can enroll in a free, online, self-paced orientation to online learning that must be completed before you can receive a SAGE consent code is enroll in this class. Due to the popularity of online classes, you should not delay in completing the orientation and registering for this class. To maintain course quality, all online classes have limited enrollment.
    Course Description: Public Speaking is an often-misunderstood form of communication consisting of both talking with and listening to an audience: it is a conversation. In this course, students will engage with public speaking skills and experiences through recorded and live video presentation. The overall course goals are for students to feel comfortable, confident, and prepared to succeed in a variety of speaking situations, to learn how to speak comfortably and effectively on video (both live and recorded), and to manage any fears of public speaking through practice, discussion, and collegial support/feedback. The course is structured to allow for students to enjoy speaking, to build a caring online learning community, and to learn from each other. This course is crafted as an online lab in speaking and listening. Students will be evaluated on their contributions to the collective learning community as well as on their own individual progress.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time: Online
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2056
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: OC
    Enrollment Limit: 10 students - early enrollment is strongly advised
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    UWS 28A: Disney to DC Comics: A Study in Villainy
    Instructor: Katherine Nadeau
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: Disney films and comic book films might at first seem to have little in common. The former are for children and typically feature princesses and princes, friendly animals and furniture, and rousing musical numbers, while the latter are intended for a more mature audience and feature men and women with superhuman strength and abilities and the threat of mass destruction and violence. Something both of these genres share, however, are villains over whom the protagonists and their allies must ultimately triumph. In this course we will seek to understand these villains as more than just a necessary component in the conflict between good and evil. What are their motivations? How do they become villains? Is there any good to be found in them? How do they shape the narratives in which they appear? What biases or ideologies do they represent? How do genre and audience affect their portrayal? These are just some of the questions we will grapple with as we attempt to understand why audiences are often so captivated by these characters and what else these popular genres might have in common. We will study a number of films including Sleeping Beauty, Maleficent, The Dark Knight, and Batman vs. Superman. In the first essay students will develop an original argument about one of the films from the first unit. In the second essay students will apply a theoretical text to a different film we have watched. In the final essay students will pursue a self-directed research project based on any of the films we have watched. Our goal throughout the course will be to develop strong writing and critical thinking skills as we immerse ourselves in a world of villainy.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2283
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: UWS
    Enrollment Limit: 10 students - early enrollment is strongly advised
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    UWS 38A: A View From the Margins: Understanding Inequality in America
    Instructor: Marisa Carey
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: The course will operate as a class that takes on historical, sociological and legal questions as we consider the how's and why's of systemic racism, sexism, and discrimination in the United States historically and in the present. Although we have all heard the words "all men are created equal" inscribed into our understanding of the fundamental meanings of the country, there has always been a history of social, economic, and political hierarchy. The class explores the impact and the function of inequality on marginalized populations while also fostering the development of incisive analysis and sophisticated academic writing. I name the course "A View From the Margins" as a nod to Kimberle Crenshaw's essay titled "Mapping the Margins" while also signaling that the class will read works from writers with connections to marginalized communities. We will read historian Mia Bay's chapter on Sally Hemmings, renowned journalist Ida B. Wells's work on lynching, and explore the analysis of such racial thinkers as James Baldwin and Ta-Nehisi Coates. In our first paper, we will close-read the work of DuBois and for the second we will use Crenshaw's essay on intersectionality as a lens. Throughout the course, I will teach them about analysis, thesis, and motives as I also give them a historical view by providing the works of great writers as examples on how to write with purpose and how to write convincingly. I will use the course as a way to build on their writing abilities but also how to understand some complex but relatable concepts on inequality. I give brief lectures with more historical context is needed while the bulk of the class takes place in the form of deep class discussion while we build on their understanding on writing effectively. I feel that the class invokes a level of passion as it provides some answers while also raising enough questions as to garner strong and thoughtful individual writing. The research paper also gives room to the students to explore some of their own personal questions perhaps on income inequality, antisemitism, trans discrimination, etc. Often, this gives students the motivation to write their papers and research their topics with passion as they seek out the answers to questions that deeply motivate them. They will walk away from the class with a deeper understanding of American history and American society while understanding that the answers lie at their fingertips.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 2:00pm - 4:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2276
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: UWS
    Enrollment Limit: 10 students - early enrollment is strongly advised
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,947 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link