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Brandeis University

    2017 Summer School Course Offerings

    Below please find the preliminary course offerings for Brandeis Summer School for 2017. By using the filters to narrow your search, you can find courses by department or by session. Please click on the row of the course you are interested in to view additional details. Questions about summer course offerings should be directed to summersc@brandeis.edu
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    DepartmentCourse NumberCourse NameClass NumberSessionDayTime
    ANTH116AHuman Osteology2047Session IIM, T, TH1:30pm - 3:50pm
    ANTH156APower and Violence: The Anthropology of Political Systems2048Session IM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    ANTH5AHuman Origins2049Session IIM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    BCHM88BIntroductory Biochemistry2050Session IM, T, W, Th11:00am-12:50pm
    BIOL15BCells and Organisms2051Session IIM, T, W, Th11:00am-12:50pm
    BIOL51ABiostatistics2052Session IM, T, W, Th9:00am-10:50am
    BISC11ABiodiversity Connections2053Online Session
    CHEM11AGeneral Chemistry I2054Session IM, T, TH, F8:30am - 10:50am
    CHEM11BGeneral Chemistry II2055Session IIM, T, TH, F8:30am - 10:50am
    CHEM18AGeneral Chemistry Laboratory I2056Session IT, TH1:00pm - 5:00pm
    CHEM18BGeneral Chemistry Lab II2057Session IIM, TH1:00pm - 5:00pm
    CHEM25AOrganic Chemistry, Lectures2058Session IM, T, TH, F8:30am - 10:50am
    CHEM25BOrganic Chemistry, Lectures2059Session IIM, T, TH, F8:30am - 10:50am
    CHEM29AOrganic Chemistry Laboratory I2060Session IT, TH1:00pm - 5:30pm
    CHEM29BOrganic Chemistry Laboratory II2061Session IIT, TH1:00pm - 5:30pm
    COSI21AData Structures and the Fundamentals of Computing2044Session IIM, T, TH8:30am - 10:50am
    COSI130AIntroduction to the Theory of Computation2045Session IM, T, TH1:30pm - 3:50pm
    COSI12BAdvanced Programming Techniques2046Session IIM, T, TH1:30pm - 3:50pm
    COSI11AProgramming in Java and C2054Session IM, T, TH8:30am - 10:50am
    ECON10AIntroduction to Microeconomics2062Session IM, T, TH8:30am - 10:50am
    ECON171AFinancial Economics2063Session IM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    ECON20AIntroduction to Macroeconomics2064Session IIM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    ECON80AMicroeconomic Theory2065Session IM, T, TH11:00am-12:50pm
    ECON82BMacroeconomic Theory2066Session IIM, T, TH8:30am - 10:50am
    ECON83AStatistics for Economic Analysis2067Session IIM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    ENG180AModern American Short Story2068Session IM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    ENG27BClassic Hollywood Cinema2069Session IM, T, TH8:30am - 10:50am
    ENG33AShakespeare2070Session IIM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    ENG79ABeginning Screenplay2071Session IM, T, TH1:30pm - 3:50pm
    ENG21AAdolescent Literature2113Session IIM, T, TH8:30am - 10:50am
    FA10AIntermediate Digital Photography: Constructing Imagery2073Session IIM, T, TH6:30pm - 8:50pm
    FA3AIntroduction to Drawing2074Session IM, T, TH6:30pm - 8:50pm
    FA4ASculpture Foundation, 3D Design I2075Session IIM, T, TH11:00am-12:50pm
    FA77BTwentieth Century Latin American Art2076Session IIM, T, TH1:30pm - 3:50pm
    FA9AIntroduction to Digital Photography2077Session IM, T, TH6:30pm - 8:50pm
    HISP20BContinuing Spanish2078Session IM, T, W, Th9:00am - 10:40am
    HISP32AIntermediate Spanish: Conversation2079Session IIM, T, W, Th8:30am - 10:50am
    HIST56BWorld History to 19602080Online Session
    INT92GUndergraduate Internship Course2114Online Session
    LGLS116BCivil Liberties in America: Constitutinoal Debates2081Online Session
    MATH10ATechniques of Calculus (A)2082Session IM, T, W, Th9:00am-10:50am
    MATH10BTechniques of Calculus2083Session IIM, T, W, Th11:00am-12:50pm
    MATH15AApplied Linear Algebra2084Session IM, T, W, Th9:00am-10:50am
    MATH20AMulti-variable Calculus2085Session IIM, T, TH, F11:00am-12:50pm
    MATH37ADifferential Equations2086Session IM, T, W, Th11:00am-12:50pm
    MATH8AIntroduction to Probability and Statistics2087Session IIM, T, W, Th9:00am-10:50am
    MUS1AExploring Western Music2088Session IM, T, TH8:30am - 10:50am
    MUS21AHistory and Practice of Electronic Dance Music: A Global Perspective2089Session IIM, T, TH11:00am-12:50pm
    NEJS185BThe Making of the Modern Middle East2090Session IIM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    NEJS189AThe Arab-Israeli Conflict2091Session IM, T, TH11:00am-12:50pm
    NPSY11BIntroduction to Behavioral Neuroscience2092Session IM, T, TH8:30am - 10:50am
    PHIL1AIntroduction to Philosophy2093Session IM, T, TH8:30am - 10:50am
    PHIL6AIntroduction to Symbolic Logic2094Session IIM, T, TH1:30pm - 3:50pm
    PHYS10AIntroduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena I2095Session IM, T, W, Th9:00am-10:50am
    PHYS10BIntroduction to Physical laws and Phenomena II2096Session IIM, T, W, Th9:00am-10:50am
    PSYC10AIntroduction to Psychology2097Session IIM, T, TH8:30am-11:20am
    PSYC2APsychological and Socio-Cultural Perspectives on Health2098Online SessionM, TH6:30pm - 8:50pm
    PSYC51AStatistics2099Session IM, T, TH8:30am - 10:50am
    SOC117ASociology of Work and Gender2100Session IM, T, TH8:30am - 10:50am
    SOC138ASociology of Race, Gender, and Class2101Session IIM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    SOC191AHealth, Community and Society2102Session IM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    THA130ASuzuki2103Session IM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    THA71A DLPlaywriting2104Online Session
    THA15B-1Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication2105Session IM, T, TH1:30pm - 3:50pm
    THA15B-3Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication2106Session IIM, T, TH8:30am - 10:50am
    THA15B-4Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication2107Session IIM, T, TH11:00am - 1:20pm
    THA15B-2Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication2112Session IM, T, TH6:30pm - 8:50pm
    UWS10AUWS 10a: Like, but not Like: Uncanny Futures in Science-Fiction2072Session IIM, T, TH1:30pm - 3:50pm
    X
    ANTH116A: Human Osteology
    Instructor: Urcid, Javier
    Course Description: This course reviews in detail human skeletal anatomy for the proper identification of the bones in the body, their biomechanical articulations and their relationship with the muscular system. Focus is then directed to studying forensic methods and techniques for the estimation of age at death, determination of sex, assessment of type of bone remodeling, identification of cultural modifications to bone, and of the impact of environmental processes on bony tissue. Hands-on laboratory sessions will involve team analysis of human remains from the comparative collection in the Archaeology Laboratory at Brandeis.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:30pm - 3:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2047
    Fulfillment: SSSN
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    X
    ANTH156A: Power and Violence: The Anthropology of Political Systems
    Instructor: Collins, Ryan
    Course Description: Are you curious or confused over how recent spikes in violence relate to currently changing political powers? Do you want to know how relations of power work among people and groups today and if they at all differ from the past? How do those with greater access to power condition and constrain the activities and choices of those without such access? What happens when encounters among people and groups become violent? This course addresses these questions through readings by classic and contemporary social theorists and anthropologists and then seeks to apply their ideas to three cases: Notions of race and class in society, with examples on how they are constructed in both the U.S. and Latin America; the culture of trafficking on borders, drawing on current tensions between the U.S. and Mexico; and the rise and impacts of resurgent nationalism. Students will write a midterm and a final paper based on a different case study of their choosing. The case study is to be submitted as a proposal and can be negotiated on in consultation with the instructor. Students will hand in an annotated bibliography (a list of 5-10 sources, each accompanied by one or two sentences explaining the role the source is expected to have in the paper) and, based on this bibliography, will receive comments and guidance to help with writing the paper. Finally, students will give an oral presentation of their projects at the end of the semester.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2048
    Fulfillment: SSNW
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    X
    ANTH5A: Human Origins
    Instructor: Urcid, Javier
    Course Description: This course covers the development of human biological and cultural endowments through a span of some 5 million years, from a hominoid stage and a foraging economy to the origins of anatomically modern humans. A consideration of humans’ place in nature as well as a review of evolutionary principles leads to discuss the archaeological findings of hominids in a diachronic framework. The journey through the bio-cultural transformation of humanity highlights the transition to bipedal locomotion, the acquisition of language, and changes in subsistence economies.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2049
    Fulfillment: SS
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    X
    BCHM88B: Introductory Biochemistry
    Instructor: Piasta, Kene
    Course Description: This course will introduce the topics that are essential for a career in medicine. Topics include protein and nucleic acid structure; metabolism of biologically important compounds; formation and utilization of "energy-rich" compounds; introduction to enzyme mechanism; comparison of basic biochemical and chemical processes; and biochemical basis of disease.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:00am-12:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2050
    Fulfillment: SN
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: One year organic chemistry with laboratory, BIOL 14A, and BIOL 15B. Does not meet the requirements for the major in biochemistry.
    X
    BIOL15B: Cells and Organisms
    Instructor: Piasta, Kene
    Course Description: This course introduces contemporary biology with an emphasis on cells, organs, and organ systems. Topics include the forms and functions of macromolecules, organelles, and cells, the integration of cells into tissues, and the physiology of fundamental life processes. The course is intended to prepare students to understand the biology of everyday life, and to provide a strong foundation for those who continue to study the life sciences.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:00am-12:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2051
    Fulfillment: SN
    Course Classification: Graduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites: May not be taken for credit by students who took BIOL 22b in prior years.
    X
    BIOL51A: Biostatistics
    Instructor: Staff, ,
    Course Description: This is a 4 credit introductory course in statistics, with an emphasis on applications in biology and other life sciences. In this course, we will relate statistics to science using practical and interesting research examples. The course is meant to be self-contained and almost no prior knowledge of statistics is assumed. The topics we cover will roughly include: Data Analysis and Descriptive Statistics, Basic Probability, Probability Distributions, Sampling, Point and Confidence Interval Estimation, Hypothesis Testing, and if time allows, the Central Limit Theorem, ANOVA, Correlation, Simple Linear Regression, and Multiple Linear Regression. You will need to be able to get your hands dirty playing with processing, and plotting data using the R computer language! Now, with that being said, this is not intended to be a programming course. The MINITAB, &/or SPSS statistical software package, excel and R will/can be used in this class for data management, and statistical analyses.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am-10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2052
    Fulfillment: SN
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    X
    BISC11A: Biodiversity Connections
    Instructor: Hitchcock, Colleen
    Course Description: The goal of this online course is to explore the evolution, extinction, and conservation of biodiversity for students not majoring in the sciences. Students leaving this course will have a firm grasp of the scientific method, the benefits and limitations of scientific conclusions and the interplay between science and society. In the online environment we will explore topics through a variety of formats to promote both instructor lead and peer facilitated learning. Often this course will take a case study approach dissecting an ecological story. Each case study explores the details from natural history to ecological and social impacts about a particular species or group of species. Then we will examine the relevant underlying scientific theory and social connections. It is impossible to explore biodiversity without promoting bioliteracy of the flora and fauna local to students. This is course will introduce students to digital species identification tools and make use of iNaturalist (www.iNaturalist.org). iNaturalist is a worldwide citizen science platform that enables users to build naturalist skills and connect with a broader local community of naturalists while at the same time providing worldwide data on species distribution to the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (www.gbif.org). Given the online structure of this course and presumed varied geographic location of students, complementing our work with this citizen science experience will enable students to have a place-based experience and develop life-long naturalist skills. In addition, it will offer insight to non-majors in the type of science contributions they can make now and in the future.
    Session: Online Session
    Day:
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2053
    Fulfillment: SN
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    X
    CHEM11A: General Chemistry I
    Instructor: Banger, Kal
    Course Description: This course covers a wide array of topics, embracing aspects of descriptive, as well as quantitative, chemistry. No prior study of chemistry is assumed, as the course begins by looking at the atomic foundation of matter, the elements, and the organization of the periodic table, working its way up to studying how atoms are bonded together to form larger units of matter. Students who complete this course will have an understanding of the three major phases of matter—solids, liquids, and gases—and how they behave, as well as a knowledge of the major types of chemical reactions and how to represent them. A strong focus is put on learning methods of creative problem-solving—using the material as a way to develop creative approaches to solving unfamiliar problems—a skill that carries students far beyond the confines of the classroom.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2054
    Fulfillment: SNQR
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have passed CHEM 15a in previous years. Four class hours and one sixty-minute structured study group session per week. The corresponding lab is CHEM 18a.
    X
    CHEM11B: General Chemistry II
    Instructor: Vela, Michael
    Course Description: This course covers basic chemical principles, with examples drawn from the chemistry of living systems as well as from environmental chemistry and materials science. Topics covered include chemical equilibrium, acid/­base chemistry, kinetics, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, radioactivity and nuclear chemistry, and coordination chemistry. The combination of the two summer sessions covers the same material presented in CHEM 11A and CHEM 11A to all science majors during the academic year.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2055
    Fulfillment: SNQR
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C­ or better) in CHEM 11A or the equivalent. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have passed CHEM 10B or 15B in previous years. The corresponding lab is CHEM 18b­Section 1, Sage class number: TBA. This course is an extension of material presented in CHEM 11A. When taken in conjunction with CHEM 11A and associated laboratory courses CHEM 18A and b, it meets the general, analytic, and inorganic chemistry requirements of medical and dental schools.
    X
    CHEM18A: General Chemistry Laboratory I
    Instructor: Banger, Kal
    Course Description: Introduction to basic laboratory methods and methods of qualitative and quantitative analyses. Included in the analytical methods are gas chromatography and infrared measurements. A synthesis project that includes analyzing the product by titration. Calorimetric experiment using probes interfaced with computers. Identification of unknowns based on physical and chemical properties. Analysis of the metal content of substances by atomic absorption.
    Session: Session I
    Day: T, TH
    Time: 1:00pm - 5:00pm
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Course Number: 2056
    Fulfillment:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $1,810 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees: $100.00
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Corequisite: CHEM 11A. Dropping CHEM 11A necessitates written permission from the lab instructor to continue with this course. Two semester-hour credits; yields half-course credit. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have passed CHEM 19a in previous years.
    X
    CHEM18B: General Chemistry Lab II
    Instructor: Vela, Michael
    Course Description: This is the second semester of the general chemistry laboratory program. Continued use of probes interfaced with computers to monitor pH and electrical conductivity changes in titrating weak monoprotic and polyprotic amino acids, to monitor pressure changes as part of a kinetics study, and to monitor voltage changes of electrochemical cells with temperature so as to establish thermodynamic parameters for redox reactions. Also included is identification of unknowns based on selective precipitation.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, TH
    Time: 1:00pm - 5:00pm
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Course Number: 2057
    Fulfillment:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees: $125.00
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 18A and CHEM 11A. Corequisite: CHEM 11B. Dropping CHEM 11Bnecessitates written permission from the lab instructor to continue with this course. May yield half-course credit toward rate of work and graduation. Two semester-hour credits. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have passed CHEM 19B in previous years.
    X
    CHEM25A: Organic Chemistry, Lectures
    Instructor: Mascall, Kristen
    Course Description: This course meets the first half of the organic chemistry requirement for chemistry, biology, premedical, and pre-dental majors when taken in conjunction with the laboratory course CHEM 29A. It is also useful for individuals in the physical and life science fields who wish to gain a working knowledge of organic chemistry. The course will examine the important classes of organic compounds of chemical, biological, and medicinal interest. Attention is focused on the relationship between structure and reactivity. Current theoretical concepts of structure, bonding, and mechanism form a basis for the interpretation of the properties and interactions as well as the synthesis and transformation of a wide range of organic compounds.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2058
    Fulfillment: SN
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 10b, 11b, 15b or the equivalent. The corresponding lab for this course is CHEM 29a.
    X
    CHEM25B: Organic Chemistry, Lectures
    Instructor: Mascall, Kristen
    Course Description: As a continuation of CHEM 25A, this course meets the second half of the organic chemistry requirement for chemistry, biology, premedical, and pre-dental majors when taken in conjunction with the laboratory course, CHEM 29B. The course will build upon concepts of structure and reactivity from CHEM 25A. Much emphasis will be placed on the chemistry of carbonyl compounds, and other biologically relevant compounds such as carbohydrates. Organic compounds of chemical, medicinal, and biological interest will be examined through current literature examples.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2059
    Fulfillment: SN
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    X
    CHEM29A: Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
    Instructor: Mascall, Kristen
    Course Description: The laboratory course affords practical experience in the synthesis, isolation, and analysis of organic compounds. Various techniques are introduced, including extraction, distillation, chromatography, and crystallization. Experimental procedures reported in current literature will be adapted in the lab to prepare molecules of biological significance. Spectroscopic methods are introduced as a means of analyzing compound structures.
    Session: Session I
    Day: T, TH
    Time: 1:00pm - 5:30pm
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Course Number: 2060
    Fulfillment:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $1,810 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees: $125.00
    Open to High School Students: No
    X
    CHEM29B: Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
    Instructor: Mascall, Kristen
    Course Description: As a continuation of CHEM 29A, this course is designed to provide additional experience in important techniques of synthesis, purification, and analysis of organic compounds. Experimental procedures reported in current literature will be adapted in the lab to prepare molecules of biological significance. Spectroscopic methods will be used to analyze compound identity and purity.
    Session: Session II
    Day: T, TH
    Time: 1:00pm - 5:30pm
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Course Number: 2061
    Fulfillment:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $1,810 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees: $125.00
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 29a or the equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 25b. Dropping CHEM 25b necessitates written permission from the lab instructor to continue with the lab. May yield half-course credit toward rate of work and graduation. Two semester hour credits.
    X
    COSI21A: Data Structures and the Fundamentals of Computing
    Instructor: DiLillo, Antonella
    Course Description: This course focuses on the design and analysis of algorithms and the use of data structures. Through the introduction of the most widely used data structures employed in solving commonly encountered problems (e.g. lists, trees, and graphs), students will learn different ways to organize data for easy access and efficient manipulation. Algorithms to solve classic problems (e.g. searching, sorting, hashing, graph algorithms, etc.) will be presented, as well as classic algorithm design strategies (e.g. divide-and-conquer and greedy algorithms). Computational complexity theory will be introduced for studying the efficiency of the algorithms covered in the course.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2044
    Fulfillment: SN
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: COSI 11a and either COSI 12b or permission from the Undergraduate Advising Head or Graduate Program Director.
    X
    COSI130A: Introduction to the Theory of Computation
    Instructor: DiLillo, Antonella
    Course Description: This course provides an introduction to some of the central ideas of theoretical computer science. We will be studying what can and cannot be computed, and when something can be computed how simply can it be done. Topics will include: finite automata and regular languages, pushdown automata and context-free languages, Turing machines, Halting problem, undecidability, and NP-completeness.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:30pm - 3:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2045
    Fulfillment: SN
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: COSI 29a. May not be taken for credit by students who took COSI 30a in prior years.
    X
    COSI12B: Advanced Programming Techniques
    Instructor: DiLillo, Antonella
    Course Description: The course will introduce students to object oriented programming using Java. It will focus on more sophisticated features such as design of classes, interfaces, packages, and APIs. It will also cover the basic principles of software design, testing and collaborative programming. Upon completion of this class, students will be able to understand the concept of object-oriented programming (OOP) as well as the purpose and usage of inheritance, polymorphism, encapsulation and method overloading. They will be able to create Java application programs using sound OOP practices (e.g., interfaces and APIs) and proper program structuring. Finally, they will be able to develop programs using the Java Collection API as well as the Java standard class library.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:30pm - 3:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2046
    Fulfillment: SN
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites: COSI 11a or programming facility in C.
    X
    COSI11A: Programming in Java and C
    Instructor: DiLillo, Antonella
    Course Description: The course is an introduction to the art and science of computer programming and related computer science principles. Through programming students will develop fundamental skills such as abstract reasoning and problem solving. Students will master programming techniques using the Java programming language, and will develop good program design methodology resulting in correct, robust, and maintainable programs. No previous background in programming is required, only dedication and hard work.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2054
    Fulfillment: SN
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    X
    ECON10A: Introduction to Microeconomics
    Instructor: Laski, Anne
    Course Description: This course introduces the field of microeconomics to students. Microeconomics is the study of how individuals and firms make decisions and how these decisions interact.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2062
    Fulfillment: SSQR
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Intended for Economics majors and minors or students who intend to take more than one Economics course. Students who have taken Econ 2a and received a B+ or better cannot receive credit for this course. May not be taken for credit by students concurrently with or after they have taken ECON 80a.
    X
    ECON171A: Financial Economics
    Instructor: Mahmud, Abdullah Al
    Course Description: This course covers topics related to financial economics, including investors' attitudes toward risk, capital allocation, and portfolio selection. The class will also examine asset pricing models (Capital Asset Pricing Model and the Arbitrage Pricing Model), the efficient market hypothesis, fixed income markets, equity valuation, options and future markets, mutual funds and hedge funds.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2063
    Fulfillment: SS
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: ECON 80A and ECON 83A or permission of the instructor.
    X
    ECON20A: Introduction to Macroeconomics
    Instructor: Munsell, Michael
    Course Description: This course provides an introduction to macroeconomics - the study of the overall or aggregate performance of national economies. The course will develop the main models economists use to understand the relationships between economic growth, unemployment, inflation,interest rates, and exchange rates in the long run and the short run. The course will also focus on the role of government policy in promoting economic growth in the long run and in limiting the effects of business cycle fluctuations in the short run.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2064
    Fulfillment: SS
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Econ 2A with a B+ or higher or Econ 10A. May not be taken for credit by students concurrently with or after they have taken ECON 82B.
    X
    ECON80A: Microeconomic Theory
    Instructor: Garcia, Raffi
    Course Description: The interaction between economic theory and the events, decisions, and empirical data from the real world lies at the heart of microeconomics. This course aims to provide a fuller understanding of microeconomic theories, including (1) developing deeper intuition than in introductory economics courses by analyzing the underlining assumptions, (2) incorporating mathematical modeling to more precisely answer economic questions and (3) providing a policy focused approach. One of the main goals of the course is to prepare students with modeling skills which, when later combined with statistics/econometrics, can be used to understand markets and make informed decisions based on data. The skills acquired may be useful to CEOs, managers, entrepreneurs, policy-makers, lawyers, voters, and citizens, among others. The material is also crucial for more advanced classes in economics.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am-12:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2065
    Fulfillment: SS
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: ECON 10a. Students must earn C- or higher in MATH 10a, or otherwise satisfy the calculus requirement, to enroll in this course.
    X
    ECON82B: Macroeconomic Theory
    Instructor: Laski, Anne
    Course Description: This course looks at models of the determination of economic aggregates, such as national income, consumption, investment, government spending, exports, imports, and international capital flows. The class will also examine economy-wide variables, such as the interest rate, the exchange rate, the price level and inflation, and the unemployment rate. The influence of fiscal and monetary policies on these aggregates and variables is examined.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2066
    Fulfillment: SS
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Econ 20A. Students must earn C- or higher in MATH 10A, or otherwise satisfy the calculus requirement to enroll in this course.
    X
    ECON83A: Statistics for Economic Analysis
    Instructor: McAvoy, Mark
    Course Description: This is a first course in statistical inference. Topics will include descriptive statistics, probability theory, the Central Limit Theorem, normal and binomial distributions, sampling distributions, point and interval estimation, properties of estimators, hypothesis testing, regression and the Gauss Markov Theorem.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2067
    Fulfillment: SSQR
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    X
    ENG180A: Modern American Short Story
    Instructor: Flesch, William
    Course Description: This course is a close study of American short-fiction masterworks. Students read as writers write, discussing solutions to narrative obstacles, examining the consequences of alternate points of view. Studies words and syntax to understand and articulate how technical decisions have moral and emotional weight.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2068
    Fulfillment: HUM
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    X
    ENG27B: Classic Hollywood Cinema
    Instructor: Flesch, William
    Course Description: This class is a critical examination of the history of mainstream U.S. cinema from the 1930s to the present. The course focuses on major developments in film content and form, the rise and fall of the studio and star system, the changing nature of spectatorship, and the social context of film production and reception.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2069
    Fulfillment: HUM
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    X
    ENG33A: Shakespeare
    Instructor: Flesch, William
    Course Description: This course is a survey of Shakespeare as a dramatist. A survey of 5-8 Shakespeare plays, based on student interest, representing all periods of Shakespeare's dramatic career.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Credit Hours:
    Course Number: 2070
    Fulfillment: HUM
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    X
    ENG79A: Beginning Screenplay
    Instructor: Weinberg, Marc
    Course Description: There's never been a better time to become a screenwriter. Breakthroughs in technology, production, and distribution have heightened the demand for good scripts. Whether you want to write a micro-budget indie or a Hollywood blockbuster, this course provides all the essential tools you’ll need. Learn the fundamentals – structure, story arc, character development – and develop the first act of your feature screenplay. You’ll also watch and analyze recent movies. Join us for a creative, low-pressure course over five weeks, and you’ll never look at a movie the same way again!
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:30pm - 3:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2071
    Fulfillment: HUMWriting Intensive
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: This course may not be repeated by students who have taken ENG 129b in previous years. Offered exclusively on a credit/no credit basis. Students will be selected after the submission of a sample of writing of no more than five pages. Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for submission formats and deadlines within registration periods.
    Instructor Biography Link: external link
    X
    ENG21A: Adolescent Literature
    Instructor: Flesch, William
    Course Description: Literature for adolescents can't afford any self-indulgences: its audience is too impatient. So it's a great place to see what's essential to storytelling. Studied authors may include Shelley, Twain, Salinger, Pullman, and Rowling, whom we'll use to test basic narrative theory.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2113
    Fulfillment: HUM
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    X
    FA10A: Intermediate Digital Photography: Constructing Imagery
    Instructor: Wiener, Scott
    Course Description: The construction of photographic imagery concerns first and foremost the arrangement and fabrication of materials to be represented as a 2-dimensional object frozen in time. This course will explore how constructing photographs can be accomplished most effectively using studio lighting, still life practices using 3D printing software and hardware, theatrical visual languages inherited by cinema, using a scanner as a camera, and a variety of digital techniques using Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop. Time will be spent both in and outside of class producing and working/reworking images based on topic-based assignments that are designed to challenge both the form and content of each student’s work. These projects and the resulting works produced will provide a framework for critical discussions of the photography’s relationship to the deployment of fictional narrative and it’s disillusionment. Critiques will include discussions of the formal elements used to express content and the conceptual ideas employed by each student. Photography will be the point of departure and reflection, but if another medium or presentation is better suited to a particular project or idea, students may be encouraged to explore those options independently. The assignments given are also meant to explore the medium’s possibilities for expression. Throughout the semester, you are strongly encouraged to seek out exhibitions and artist talks to share during discussions as they relate to our topic. We may attend at least one exhibition or artist talk as a class if time permits. In addition to studio work, we will photographic images by Mike Kelley, Louise Lawler, Carrie Mae Weems, Gregory Crewdson, and others to gain a sense of contemporary and historical practices relevant to constructing situations for the camera. We will view the film “Dogville” directed by Lars von Trier and “Office Killer” by Cindy Sherman. Additionally, we will read texts by Mark Godfrey, Rosalind Krauss, Walter Benjamin, and Susan Sontag (among others) and discuss their relationship to the construction of photographic imagery. All texts and films will be accompanied by class discussions and required responses. There is also a written statement that accompanies the final project, which will define, describe, and elaborate on each students ideas and how they relate to the content of the course.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 6:30pm - 8:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2073
    Fulfillment: CA
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees: $75.00
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: FA 4A, 4B, 9A or permission of the instructor.
    X
    FA3A: Introduction to Drawing
    Instructor: Gisholt, Alfredo
    Course Description: This is a studio class that introduces a range of drawing materials and methods, intended for both studio majors and non-majors. Students will draw from direct observation of still-life, landscape, and the human figure. Drawing media may include graphite, charcoal, ink, and collage, as well as watercolor and pastel. The drawings of great artists throughout history will be studied to provide examples of what is possible within this broad and expressive visual language.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 6:30pm - 8:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2074
    Fulfillment: CA
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees: $75.00
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Beginning-level course. No previous drawing experience necessary. Preference to first-year students and sophomores. May be repeated once for credit if taught by different instructors.
    Instructor Biography Link: external link
    X
    FA4A: Sculpture Foundation, 3D Design I
    Instructor: Frost, Chris
    Course Description: This course is an exploration of the sculptural process through an introduction of artistic design, material and technical procedures. We will explore the elements and principles of 3D design; form, space, mass, scale, light and color and their responses to physical forces and time. Students will be introduced to various materials; wood, plaster, clay, metal, etc. To facilitate the use of these materials, students will be instructed in techniques of wood and metal working, plaster use, mold-making and casting with all related safety requirements.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am-12:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2075
    Fulfillment: CA
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees: $75.00
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites: Beginning-level course. Preference to first-year students and sophomores. May be repeated once for credit if taught by different instructors.
    X
    FA77B: Twentieth Century Latin American Art
    Instructor: Falconi, Jose
    Course Description: This course is a survey of the major trends and visual artists from Latin America, starting with early modernism (circa 1890s) and going up to the present times. Course will include visits and outings to museums and galleries in Boston.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:30pm - 3:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2076
    Fulfillment: NWCA
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites: May not be taken for credit by students who took FA 24b in prior years.
    X
    FA9A: Introduction to Digital Photography
    Instructor: Wiener, Scott
    Course Description: This introduction to the visual forms and concepts of the photographic image covers a range of digital techniques along with aspects of the history of photography. Students must provide their own digital camera. Field trips and image presentations supplement the studio aspect of the course. Students will develop the technical and aesthetic skills to make challenging digital photographs. Technical skills acquired include: digital camera manual functions, basic use of Adobe Photoshop and inkjet printing. Students will also nurture a critical relationship to technological imagery through critique and class discussion. Conceptual topics covered are: the relationship between form and content, the translatability of “Real” events into aesthetic objects, and what it means to do this. Instructional Objectives: This class will cover several topics surrounding the technical/formal skill needed to create an image and the visual language necessary to engage photographic works critically. Students will learn about digital cameras and how to use and manipulate them internally and externally. Subsequently, time will be spent learning different techniques in Photoshop to better control the look of the photographs. In addition to the required text (A Short Course in Digital Photography by Barbara London and Jim Stone) we will read and discuss an additional text specific to picture-making. This work will provide another perspective concerning the production and reception of images. After processing the files through Photoshop, the images will be printed using the Epson printers. Success in this 4 credit hour course is based on the expectation that students will spend a minimum of 8 hours of study time per week in preparation for class (photographing, image editing, printing, readings, writings, preparation for critiques, etc). Following each assignment we will discuss the technical and conceptual components of each student’s work as a group. We will also view the work of historic and contemporary artists to learn about the various expressive possibilities the medium has to offer. Students are expected to contribute to class discussion because the creation of art is a social act; it is about the exchange of ideas. When a photograph is created and shown it has the power to communicate an experience of distance to a larger audience. We will discuss and analyze how the pictures we produce become a part of that dialogue.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 6:30pm - 8:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2077
    Fulfillment: CA
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees: $75.00
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: One Brandeis studio art course. May be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor.
    X
    HISP20B: Continuing Spanish
    Instructor: Arteta, Jorge
    Course Description: This course is for students with some previous study of Spanish: a continuing presentation of the basic grammar and vocabulary of the language within the context of Hispanic culture. The course will focus on all five language skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and sociocultural awareness.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am - 10:40am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2078
    Fulfillment:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 10a or the equivalent.
    X
    HISP32A: Intermediate Spanish: Conversation
    Instructor: Mederos, Raysa
    Course Description: HISP32A is a course designed to help students progress in their language acquisition process and achieve a higher proficiency level – mid to high intermediate. Class work will provide ample opportunities for students to further develop the four skills –speaking, writing, listening and reading. In-class activities will require the use of Spanish in meaningful contexts to communicate specific language functions such as narration, description, comparison, expressing preferences, talking about the future, reacting and giving opinions, recommendations, commands, etc. A review of the grammar previously learned in elementary courses will enhance the students’ accuracy when using the language. The culture of various Spanish speaking countries as well as that of Hispanic communities in the United States will be explored through cultural and literary readings, videos, music, art and movies.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2079
    Fulfillment: FL
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 20B or the equivalent. Students enrolling for the first time in a Hispanic Studies course at Brandeis should refer to www.brandeis.edu/registrar/newstudent/testing.html#spantest.
    X
    HIST56B: World History to 1960
    Instructor: Mann, Michelle
    Course Description: Survey of world history from 1450 to 1960. Topics include development of worldwide networks of economic and cultural exchange; the rise of modern political and industrial systems; colonialism, imperialism, and resistance; transformation of religious/philosophical systems and constructions of race and gender; environmental change.
    Session: Online Session
    Day:
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2080
    Fulfillment: SSNW
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    X
    INT92G: Undergraduate Internship Course
    Instructor: Stalsberg Canelli, Alyssa
    Course Description: The purpose of this course is to help students to think critically about the organization and industry in which they are currently interning, while developing and articulating their personal narrative. Students will use their assignments and reflections to analyze their internship experience and articulate their academic, professional and personal goals, motivations and values. Through this process, students build their own meta-awareness about their learning process and how to extend it in the future. Students will also benefit from the collective learning of their peers. The activities and assignments for this course have been developed using active and reflective learning in order to help students maximize their internship experience. More details on INT 92G can be found on the summer school website under Registration, Brandeis Students.
    Session: Online Session
    Day:
    Time:
    Credit Hours:
    Course Number: 2114
    Fulfillment:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $450 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    X
    LGLS116B: Civil Liberties in America: Constitutinoal Debates
    Instructor: Breen, Dan
    Course Description: This class addresses the history and politics of civil liberties and civil rights in the United States, with focus on the period from World War I to the present. Emphasis on freedom of speech, religion, abortion, privacy, racial discrimination, and affirmative action. The class includes readings from Supreme Court cases and influential works by historians and political philosophers.
    Session: Online Session
    Day:
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2081
    Fulfillment: SS
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Formerly offered as LGLS/POL 116b.
    X
    MATH10A: Techniques of Calculus (A)
    Instructor: Wong, Biji
    Course Description: MATH 10A is the introduction to differential (and some integral) calculus of one variable, with emphasis on techniques and applications.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am-10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2082
    Fulfillment: SN
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade of C- or higher in MATH 5a or placement by examination. Students may not take MATH 10a if they have received a satisfactory grade in MATH 10b or MATH 20a.
    X
    MATH10B: Techniques of Calculus
    Instructor: Larsen, Zachary
    Course Description: This course is an introduction to integral calculus of one variable with emphasis on techniques and applications.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:00am-12:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2083
    Fulfillment: SN
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade of C- or higher in MATH 10a or placement by examination. Continuation of 10a. Students may not take MATH 10a and MATH 10b simultaneously. Students may not take MATH 10b if they have received a satisfactory grade in MATH 20a.
    X
    MATH15A: Applied Linear Algebra
    Instructor: Krumpak, McKee
    Course Description: This course will examine matrices, determinants, linear equations, vector spaces, eigenvalues, quadratic forms, linear programming. There will be an emphasis on techniques and applications.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am-10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2084
    Fulfillment: SN
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: MATH 5a and permission of the instructor, placement by examination, or any mathematics course numbered 10 or above. Students may take MATH 15a or 22a for credit, but not both.
    X
    MATH20A: Multi-variable Calculus
    Instructor: Zhou, Ying
    Course Description: Among the topics treated in this course are vectors and vector-valued functions, partial derivatives and multiple integrals, extremum problems, line and surface integrals, Green's and Stokes's theorems. Emphasis on techniques and applications.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 11:00am-12:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2085
    Fulfillment: SN
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: MATH 10a and b or placement by examination. Students may take MATH 20a or 22b for credit, but not both. Students may not take MATH 10A or 10B concurrently with MATH 20A.
    X
    MATH37A: Differential Equations
    Instructor: Li, Yiting
    Course Description: The course places emphasis on qualitative versus quantitative methods. We first study first order differential equations. We will study modeling using differential equations, separation of variables, slope fields, numerical methods-Euler’s method. The existence and uniqueness theorem will be discussed and its implications. Also equilbria and phase lines will be introduced, along with bifurcations theory. Finally linear equations and integrating factors will be studied. We then with the above insights, go on to first order systems, again modeling using systems. We study the geometry of systems and in particular the damped harmonic oscillator and generalize the methods of the above paragraph to first order systems and finally study the Lorenz equations to illustrate the so-called butterfly effect. We then study linear systems using linear algebra. This includes the superposition principle, straight line solutions, phase portraits for linear systems with real eigenvalues and finally complex eigenvalues. Then repeated and zero eigenvalue cases are studied and then higher differential equations are viewed as first order systems. Finally we go into three dimensions systematically. We briefly study nonlinear systems and how the above techniques are applied and in particular, equalibria and qualitative tools and linear analysis are used as well as numerical methods. Finally we study forcing and resonance , via the forced harmonic oscillator and sinusoidal forcing. We study undamped forcing and resonance and amplitude and the steady state. We end with the Tacoma Bridge collapse, on a high note.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:00am-12:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2086
    Fulfillment: SN
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: MATH 15A or 22a and MATH 20A or 22B.
    X
    MATH8A: Introduction to Probability and Statistics
    Instructor: Levear, Duncan
    Course Description: This course will focus on discrete probability spaces, random variables, expectation, variance, approximation by the normal curve, sample mean and variance, and confidence intervals. Students are not required to have completed calculus to enroll; only high school algebra and graphing of functions.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am-10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2087
    Fulfillment: SNQR
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    X
    MUS1A: Exploring Western Music
    Instructor: Fulkerson, Jessica
    Course Description: This course is an introduction to musical ideas and compositions, and presents a survey of the major developments in the music of Western civilization from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. Students will develop an understanding of, and appreciation for, the many genres of “art” music that have developed in Western culture since the Middle Ages, and will be able to discuss this music using appropriate terminology.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2088
    Fulfillment: CA
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites: Does not meet requirements for the major or minor in music.
    X
    MUS21A: History and Practice of Electronic Dance Music: A Global Perspective
    Instructor: Stratford, Charles
    Course Description: This course examines the stylistic evolution, cultural significance, and technological dimensions of electronic dance music (“EDM”) from the late 1970s to the present day. Some questions will be posed: what are the origins of electronic dance music and how does this genre affect other types of popular music? How does one’s cultural sensibility influence the way that one creates and experiences music? How have advancements in technology shaped the development of this genre? We shall address the origins of EDM as an underground movement emerging from Detroit, Germany, and the UK, leading into its prominence in mainstream culture worldwide. Particular attention will be devoted to how the cultural dynamics of race, class, and identity influence the creation and reception of this music. Designed as listening intensive, this course aims at developing listening skills and the ability to reflect on the music through short weekly written assignments, with the goal of being able to think about and discuss EDM intelligently. While some musical knowledge is beneficial, this course is intended for undergraduates with any level of experience in playing, writing, or studying music.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am-12:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2089
    Fulfillment: CA
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link: external link
    X
    NEJS185B: The Making of the Modern Middle East
    Instructor: Geller, Randall
    Course Description: One hundred years ago, the borders of modern Middle Eastern states did not exist; conquering European countries carved up the former Ottoman Empire and created new states – and new problems. In this class we will explore the development of each Middle Eastern country’s unique identity and history and the domestic and foreign problems, policies, and issues each country faces today. In this context we will explore the role of the Great Powers after World War I, the role of the United States in the promotion of regime change in the Arab and broader Muslim world and its effects on the region today, as well as more recent Russian intervention in Syria. We will explore tensions between Arab nationalism and political Islam and the after-effects of the Arab Spring. We will learn about the war and the mass refugee crisis in Syria and how the region, Europe, and the United States intends to manage it. We will explore the role of ISIS and other militant groups, the Shii Islamic theocracy in Iran, as well as tensions between a legacy of secularism after World War I and a return to Islamism in Turkey. Finally, we will explore how ethnic and sectarian differences impact and define each Middle Eastern country’s social and political development. The class will be discussion-based with lecture; relevant video footage will be used to illuminate the region’s unique history and political style.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2090
    Fulfillment: HUMSSWriting IntensiveNW
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    X
    NEJS189A: The Arab-Israeli Conflict
    Instructor: Geller, Randall
    Course Description: The Arab-Israeli Conflict remains as one of the world’s most intractable problems and the conflict deeply pre-occupies US presidents and policy makers. What are the roots of this intractable conflict, how did it develop, and how can it be solved – if at all? In this course we will wrestle with all of these questions; we will learn about the birth of Israel in 1948, the origins of the Palestinian refugee problem, the multiple wars between Israel and the Arab states, the rise of the PLO, Hamas, and Hizballah as well as efforts to achieve peace. The role of oil and the status of the West Bank, Gaza, and Jerusalem will be explored in this course through a combination of lecture, video, and discussion; current events will play a major role too. The rise of ISIS and the dangers it presents to the region and the world will also be explored. By the conclusion of the course students will have a far better grasp of the core issues of a conflict that has dominated the headlines for more than half a century and likely will continue to for decades to come.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am-12:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2091
    Fulfillment: HUMSS
    Course Classification:
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    X
    NPSY11B: Introduction to Behavioral Neuroscience
    Instructor: James, Eric
    Course Description: This course focus on concepts of brain-behavior relationships. It begins with an introduction to sensory systems and progresses the biological mechanism that underlie various behaviors ranging from basic survival mechanisms (feeding and reproduction) to more complex cognitive tasks (language and learning & memory).
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2092
    Fulfillment: SSSN
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: PSYC 10A (formerly PSYC 1A) or MATH 10A or permission of the instructor. May meet the requirements for the major in Biology. Please see "Category 2" under the Requirements for the Major in Biology for further details or contact the Biology department.
    X
    PHIL1A: Introduction to Philosophy
    Instructor: Marusic, Berislav
    Course Description: This course will offer a problem-based introduction to philosophy. We will consider the following philosophical questions: What can we know about the world external to our senses? What can we know about the thoughts and feelings of others? What is the relationship between our minds and our brains? What makes certain sounds and inscriptions meaningful, while most other sounds and inscriptions are not? Can we have free will in a causally determined world governed by natural laws? What makes an action right or wrong? What does justice require of us? What is the evil of death? What is the meaning of life? The course aims to motivate these questions and introduce students to the methods of contemporary analytic philosophy.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2093
    Fulfillment: HUM
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link: external link
    X
    PHIL6A: Introduction to Symbolic Logic
    Instructor: Jenny, Matthias
    Course Description: This course introduces you to the aims and techniques of modern symbolic logic, which find applications everywhere from linguistics and the law (including the LSAT) to mathematics and computer science. The course is roughly divided into two parts: first, we cover sentence logic and then we turn to predicate logic. Topics covered include (don't worry if you don't understand this yet): truth-functional connectives, truth tables, truth trees, natural deduction, quantifiers, identity, validity, equivalence, and proof. There are no prerequisites for the course; no philosophy, engineering, mathematics, or computer science background is presupposed.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:30pm - 3:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2094
    Fulfillment: HUM
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link: external link
    X
    PHYS10A: Introduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena I
    Instructor: Martens, Edward
    Course Description: This course is an introduction to Newtonian mechanics, kinetic theory, and thermodynamics.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am-10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2095
    Fulfillment: SNQR
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Corequisite: MATH 10A or equivalent. Usually taken with PHYS 18A.
    X
    PHYS10B: Introduction to Physical laws and Phenomena II
    Instructor: Martens, Edward
    Course Description: This course serves as an introduction to electricity and magnetism, optics, special theory of relativity, and the structure of the atom.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am-10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2096
    Fulfillment: SNQR
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: PHYS 10A. Usually taken with PHYS 18B.
    X
    PSYC10A: Introduction to Psychology
    Instructor: Boshyan, Jasmine
    Course Description: This course is a survey of contemporary psychology. Topics include brain and behavior, perception, memory, learning, cognitive processes, plasticity, intelligence, child and adult development, personality, social behavior, and the relationship between normal and abnormal behavior.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am-11:20am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2097
    Fulfillment: SS
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites: May not be taken for credit by students who took PSYC 1a in prior years.
    X
    PSYC2A: Psychological and Socio-Cultural Perspectives on Health
    Instructor: Polito, Michael
    Course Description: This course surveys topics in psychology, sociology, and anthropology, with the aims of offering pre-health and pre-clinical psychology students topical knowledge and analytic competencies required for broad, liberal arts problem-solving, modern medical school and clinical psychology curricula and entrance exams.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: M, TH
    Time: 6:30pm - 8:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2098
    Fulfillment: SS
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites: Does not meet the requirements for the major in psychology.
    X
    PSYC51A: Statistics
    Instructor: Boshyan, Jasmine
    Course Description: This course covers the fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistics. The various techniques useful in the behavioral sciences will be emphasized. Students learn the theory of statistical decisions and practical application of statistical software (SPSS).
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2099
    Fulfillment: QRSS
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: PSYC 10A (formerly PSYC 1A) or the permission of the instructor. This course normally should be completed by the end of the sophomore year.
    X
    SOC117A: Sociology of Work and Gender
    Instructor: Lucas, Kimberly
    Course Description: While we may not recognize it, gender plays a profound role in the way in which we all experience everyday life. Work, a major facet of society, is deeply affected by gender. While the wage gap between men and women has decreased over the past several decades, it persists nonetheless. This course examines gender disparities in both unpaid and paid work and how these disparities affect everyone’s lives (regardless of gender) and society at large, and by using a sociological lens, this course begins to uncover the societal mechanisms through which phenomena like the wage gap, traditional gender roles, and gendered jobs persist.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2100
    Fulfillment: SS
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    X
    SOC138A: Sociology of Race, Gender, and Class
    Instructor: Monroe, Nicholas
    Course Description: This course explores the intersections of race, gender, and class and how they structure and shape institutions, cultures, and social processes. Drawing from the works of sociologists, feminists, and critical race theorists, among others, students will examine how inequalities are produced and perpetuated in political and legal institutions, the education system, families, and the economy. Students will engage in close readings, classroom discussions, and written assignments in order to analyze the ways in which race, gender, and class influence these institutions. In addition, we will consider the theoretical, methodological, and empirical challenges of studying the interrelatedness of race, gender, and class. The Sociology of Race, Gender, and Class offers students an opportunity to critically examine the past and will help them further develop the tools to assess present social conditions and problems.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2101
    Fulfillment: SS
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    X
    SOC191A: Health, Community and Society
    Instructor: Slodden, Caitlin
    Course Description: This course will be an exploration into interrelationships among society, health, and disease. There will be an emphasis on the social causes and experience of illness.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2102
    Fulfillment: SS
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    X
    THA130A: Suzuki
    Instructor: Green, Brandon
    Course Description: Developed by the Japanese theater artist Tadashi Suzuki, the Suzuki method of acting training develops physical strength, stamina, and agility while engaging the imagination and will of the actor. Through a series of walks, statues, and marches, students are taught to breathe and move from the core of their bodies. This training allows students to act from physical impulse, resulting in a deep and personal experience of language and the world of play.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2103
    Fulfillment: PE-1CA
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Prerequisites: Counts as one activity course toward the physical education requirement. Undergraduates may repeat this course twice for credit, once with each instructor.
    X
    THA71A DL: Playwriting
    Instructor: Coroniti, Joseph
    Course Description: Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of playwriting. We will focus on dramatic structure, the development of character, and stage dialogue. In addition to completing a number of playwriting exercises, students will write a ten-minute play and a one-act play. This online workshop is asynchronous; we do not meet in real time. Members post writing according to their own time zones.
    Session: Online Session
    Day:
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2104
    Fulfillment: Writing IntensiveCA
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites: THA 10A or permission of the instructor. May not be taken for credit by students who took THA 104a in prior years.
    X
    THA15B-1: Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication
    Instructor: Cleary, Jennifer
    Course Description: This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of making oral presentations to groups of people. Students will explore the principles of human communication and apply them to various situations and forms of spoken discourse. Students will develop a process for preparing their speeches, analyzing the audience and situation, choosing, limiting, and researching topics, developing effective habits of vocal delivery, and finding their own voice and style in communicating to an audience. The course counts as an Oral Communication course.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:30pm - 3:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2105
    Fulfillment: OCCA
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    X
    THA15B-3: Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication
    Instructor: Jacobs, Alexander
    Course Description: THA 15B introduces the basic concepts and techniques of making presentations to groups of people. Students will explore the principles of human communication and apply them to various situations and forms of spoken discourse. In this class, students will develop a process for analyzing the audience and situation; for choosing, limiting, and researching a subject; for developing effective habits of vocal delivery; and for writing their own speeches.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 10:50am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2106
    Fulfillment: OCCA
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites: Does not meet the requirements for the major or minor in theater arts.
    X
    THA15B-4: Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication
    Instructor: Jacobs, Alexander
    Course Description: THA 15B introduces the basic concepts and techniques of making presentations to groups of people. Students explore the principles of human communication and apply them to various situations and forms of spoken discourse. Students develop a process for analyzing the audience and situation; for choosing, limiting, and researching a subject; for developing effective habits of vocal delivery; and for writing their own speeches.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:00am - 1:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2107
    Fulfillment: OCCA
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Prerequisites: Does not meet the requirements for the major or minor in theater arts.
    X
    THA15B-2: Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication
    Instructor: Cleary, Jennifer
    Course Description: This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of making oral presentations to groups of people. Students will explore the principles of human communication and apply them to various situations and forms of spoken discourse. Students will develop a process for preparing their speeches, analyzing the audience and situation, choosing, limiting, and researching topics, developing effective habits of vocal delivery, and finding their own voice and style in communicating to an audience. The course counts as an Oral Communication course.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 6:30pm - 8:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2112
    Fulfillment: OCCA
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    X
    UWS10A: UWS 10a: Like, but not Like: Uncanny Futures in Science-Fiction
    Instructor: Eggebrecht, Paige
    Course Description: This University Writing Seminar examines the cyborgs, androids, clones, replicants, and other “skin jobs” of science-fiction films and television as they intersect with the concepts of the Uncanny, Dystopia, and Biopower. Not only do these narrative archetypes of the almost-human examine the possibilities and ethical horrors of our technological future, they also actualize real xenophobia, racism, and sexism in a socially digestible cultural mode, science-fiction. The creation of artificial humans, as depicted in film and television, demands of us to investigate our own political and cultural beliefs about slavery, human trafficking, prostitution, and identity politics, as well as individual autonomy, property, and rights. This writing seminar will examine the various ways in which clones, cyborgs, and other artificial humans have been presented in science-fiction film and television. Students will view films including, but not limited to Terminator, Orphan Black, Robocop, Humans, Blade Runner, Ex Machina, and Battlestar Gallactica. In addition to shorter writing assignments and blog posts, students will be asked to write three papers over the course of the session. The first will be a close reading essay which focuses on evidence and analysis of a film scene or character. The second is a “lens” essay in which students will use selections from Michel Foucault’s Discipline and Punish or Donna Haraway’s Simians, Cyborgs, and Women to interpret a film. The final essay is a research essay in which students will be expected to research and write on a film or show and topic from relating to the primary topics of the class.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:30pm - 3:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Course Number: 2072
    Fulfillment: UWS
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $2,725 (+$50 registration fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes