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    DepartmentCourse NumberCourse NameClass NumberSessionDayTime
    ANTH116AHuman Osteology2004Session IIM, T, TH1:50pm - 4:20pm
    ANTH5AHuman Origins2003Session IIM, T, TH11:10am - 1:40pm
    BCHM88BIntroductory Biochemistry2005Session IIM, T, W, Th9:00am - 11:00am
    BIOL15BCells and Organisms2006Session IM, T, W, Th9:00am - 11:00am
    BIOL26APlant Biology2027Online SessionOnline
    BIOL42A - Section 1Physiology - Section 12394Online SessionOnline
    BIOL42A - Section 2Physiology - Section 22442Online SessionOnline
    BISC10BThe Biology of Women's Health2110Online SessionOnline
    BISC11ABiodiversity Connections2028Online SessionOnline
    BUS 71AIntroduction to Finance2132Session IIM, T, TH1:50pm - 4:20pm
    BUS211FAnalyzing Big Data I (2 credits) - July 7-July 232141IBS Session IIT, TH10:00am - 12:50pm
    BUS240FInformation Visualization (2 credits - July 28-Aug. 13, 2020)2142IBS Session IIT, TH10:00am - 12:50pm
    CHEM11AGeneral Chemistry I2007Session IM, T, TH, F8:30am - 11:00am
    CHEM11BGeneral Chemistry II2038Session IIM, T, TH, F8:30am - 11:00am
    CHEM25AOrganic Chemistry I2002Session IM, T, TH, F8:30am - 11:00am
    CHEM25BOrganic Chemistry II2040Session IIM, T, TH, F8:30am - 11:00am
    COSI 10AIntroduction to Problem Solving in Python2010Session IM, T, W, Th9:00am - 11:00am
    COSI 12BAdvanced Programming Techniques in Java2422Session IIM, T, W, Th9:00am - 11:00am
    COSI 21AData Structures and the Fundamentals of Computing2012Session IM, T, W, Th11:10am - 1:10pm
    COSI131AOperating Systems2432Session IIM, T, W, Th11:10am - 1:10pm
    COSI152AWeb Application Development2427Session IM, T, W, Th11:10am - 1:10pm
    COSI153AMobile Application Development2423Session IM, T, W, Th9:00am - 11:00am
    ECON 2AA Survey of Economics2043Session IIM, T, TH1:50pm - 4:20pm
    ECON 20AIntroduction to Macroeconomics2042Session IIM, T, TH8:30am - 11:00am
    ECON10AIntroduction to Microeconomics2013Session IM, T, TH1:50pm - 4:20pm
    ECON151A - Section 1Statistical Modeling with R for Economics and Finance - Section 12137Online SessionOnline
    ECON151A - Section 2Statistical Modeling with R for Economics and Finance - Section 22457Online SessionOnline
    ECON171AFinancial Economics2428Online SessionOnline
    ECON202AApplied International Macroeconomics - July 7-Aug. 21 (Undergraduates receive credit for ECON 161a: International Finance)2143IBS Session IIT, TH2:00pm - 4:50pm
    ECON25AOral Communication in Economics Practicum2459Session IT, F7:00am - 9:00am
    ECON28B - Section 1The Global Economy - Section 12029Online SessionOnline
    ECON28B - Section 2The Global Economy - Section 22467Online SessionOnline
    ECON80A - Section 1Microeconomic Theory - Section 1 in Session 22044Session IIM, T, TH11:10am - 1:40pm
    ECON80A - Section 2Microeconomic Theory - Section 2 in Session 12395Session IM, T, TH8:30am - 11:00am
    ECON82B - Section 1Macroeconomic Theory2014Online SessionOnline
    ECON82B - Section 2Macroeconomic Theory2458Session IM, T, TH, F1:50pm - 3:50pm
    ECON83AStatistics for Economic Analysis2045Session IIM, T, TH6:30pm - 9:00pm
    ENG126BJoyce's Ulysses2452Session IM, T, W, Th11:10am - 1:10pm
    ENG147AFilm Noir2047Session IIM, T, TH11:10am - 1:40pm
    ENG180AThe Modern American Short Story2048Session IIM, T, TH8:30am - 11:00am
    ENG79AScreenwriting Workshop: Beginning Screenplay2015Session IM, T, TH1:50pm - 4:20pm
    FA3A - Section 1Introduction to Drawing I2016Session IM, T, TH6:30pm - 9:00pm
    FA3A - Section 2Introduction to Drawing I2447Session IIM, T, TH6:30pm - 9:00pm
    FA4ASculpture Foundation: 3-D Design I2017Session IIM, T, TH1:50pm - 4:20pm
    FIN201AInvestments (undergraduates receive credit for ECON 171 Financial Economics)2407IBS Session IIW, F10:00am - 12:50pm
    FIN212AAccounting and Financial Analysis - July 7-Aug 21 (undergraduates receive credit for BUS 6a: Financial Accounting)2405IBS Session IIT, TH10:00am - 12:50pm
    GECS188BHuman/Nature: European Perspectives on Climate Change2446Session IIM, T, W, Th7:00pm - 9:00pm
    HIST56BWorld History to 19602456Session IIM, T, TH11:10am - 1:40pm
    HSSP114BRacial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care2444Session IIM, T, TH8:30am - 11:00am
    IGS10AIntroduction to International and Global Studies2030Online SessionOnline
    INT92gUndergraduate Summer Internship2031Online SessionOnline
    MATH 8AIntroduction to Probability and Statistics2051Session IIM, T, W, Th11:10am - 1:10pm
    MATH10ATechniques of Calculus (a)2018Session IM, T, W, Th1:50pm - 3:50pm
    MATH10BTechniques of Calculus (b)2049Session IIM, T, W, Th1:50pm - 3:50pm
    MATH15AApplied Linear Algebra2019Session IM, T, W, Th9:00am - 11:00am
    MATH20AMulti-variable Calculus2050Session IIM, T, W, Th9:00am - 11:00am
    MATH36AProbability2020Session IM, T, W, Th1:50pm - 3:50pm
    MATH37ADifferential Equations2424Session IIM, T, W, Th11:10am - 1:10pm
    MATH39AIntroduction to Combinatorics2046Session IM, T, W, Th11:10am - 1:10pm
    PHIL 6AIntroduction to Symbolic Logic2033Session IIM, T, TH1:50pm - 4:20pm
    PHIL131APhilosophy of Mind2032Session IM, T, TH1:50pm - 4:20pm
    PHYS10AIntroduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena I2454Session IM, T, W, Th7:00pm - 9:00pm
    PHYS10BIntroduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena II2455Session IIM, T, W, Th7:00pm - 9:00pm
    POL15A - Section 1Introduction to International Relations - Section 12396Online SessionOnline
    POL15A - Section 2Introduction to International Relations - Section 22468Online SessionOnline
    PSYC148AApplied Statistical Computing in R2034Online SessionOnline
    PSYC33ADevelopmental Psychology2024Session IM, T, TH11:10am - 1:40pm
    PSYC51A - Section 1Statistics - Section 12025Session IM, T, TH8:30am - 11:00am
    PSYC52AResearch Methods and Laboratory in Psychology2054Session IIM, T, TH8:30am - 11:00am
    REL151AThe Buddha: His Life and Teachings2055Session IIM, T, TH11:10am - 1:40pm
    SOC182AApplied Research Methods2445Session IIM, T, TH11:10am - 1:40pm
    SOC1AOrder and Change in Society2035Online SessionOnline
    THA15B - Section 1Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication - Section 12036Online SessionOnline
    THA15B - Section 2Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication - Section 22037Online SessionOnline
    THA2AIntroduction to Theater: From the Page to the Stage2397Online SessionOnline
    UWS16ASex and Advertising2425Session IM, T, TH8:30am - 11:00am
    UWS48ALove: Where, When, How, Who?2426Session IIM, T, TH8:30am - 11:00am
    X
    ANTH 116A: Human Osteology
    Instructor: Javier Urcid
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: Human Osteology reviews in detail human skeletal anatomy for the proper identification of the bones in the body, their biomechanical articulations, and their relationship with the muscular system. Focus is then directed to studying forensic methods and techniques for the estimation of age at the time of death, determination of sex, assessment of type of bone remodeling, identification of cultural modifications to bone, and of the impact of environmental processes on bony tissue. Hands-on laboratory sessions involve team analysis of human remains from the comparative collection in the Archaeology Laboratory at Brandeis. The course combines lectures, class discussions, trans-media materials, and a hands-on project where students-- organized in groups--use the human skeletal comparative collection to collect data and write a research paper that mimics a forensic report on a set of commingled and highly fragmented remains. For this project students are challenged to determine the minimum number of individuals represented in the sample, the estimation of their age at the time of death, the determination of the chromosomal sex, the presence or absence of bone remodeling that may have been caused by disease or trauma, and presence or absence of cultural modifications to the remains. The lectures make use of PowerPoint presentations that deploy images, sparse text, and links to documentary clips, TED talks, and an online dictionary (to clarify the etymology of Greek and Roman anatomical terms).
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:50pm - 4:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2004
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS, SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ANTH 5A: Human Origins
    Instructor: Javier Urcid
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: Human Origins covers the transformation of human biological and cultural endowments through a span of some 7 million years, from a hominoid stage to the appearance of anatomically modern humans. A consideration of the human genome, of our place in nature--including our relationship with non-human primates--, and a review of evolutionary principles, leads to a broad coverage of the archaeological findings of hominids in a diachronic framework. Further consideration is placed on the selective processes that led to the human reliance on symbolic adaptations. The journey through the bio-cultural transformations of humanity highlights the emergence of bipedal locomotion, the increased levels of encephalization, changes in subsistence practices, the control of fire, the appearance of language, and the anthropogenic impacts of the global dispersal of modern humans.The course is lecture-oriented and combines in-class presentations with discussions of assigned readings. Students engage throughout the summer session in the critical assessment of several video documentaries. Students make these assessments using the conceptual tools that are presented and discussed in class. The lectures make use of PowerPoint presentations that deploy images, sparse text, as well as links to documentary clips, TED talks, and other online resources on themes such as human genomics, comparative anatomy, ethology of non-human primates, hominid fossils, archaeological projects at key localities, and synthetic views on human evolution.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:10am - 1:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2003
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    BCHM 88B: Introductory Biochemistry
    Instructor: Kene Piasta
    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: One year organic chemistry with laboratory, BIOL 14a, and BIOL 15b. Does not meet the requirements for the major in biochemistry or chemistry.
    Course Description: Topics include protein and nucleic acid structure; metabolism of biologically important compounds; formation and utilization of "energy-rich" compounds; introduction to enzyme mechanism; comparison of basic biochemical and chemical processes; and biochemical basis of disease.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2005
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    BIOL 15B: Cells and Organisms
    Instructor: Kene Piasta
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: Introduces contemporary biology with an emphasis on cells, organs, and organ systems. Topics include the forms and functions of macromolecules, organelles, and cells, the integration of cells into tissues, and the physiology of fundamental life processes. The course is intended to prepare students to understand the biology of everyday life, and to provide a strong foundation for those who continue to study the life sciences.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2006
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    BIOL 26A: Plant Biology
    Instructor: Melissa Kosinski-Collins
    Prerequisites: BIOL 14a and BIOL 15b
    Course Description: This online course is designed for students who have taken Bio14 and Bio15 (or have permission of the instructor) and are interested in learning the fundamentals of plant biology. The course is intended for students who are familiar with central dogma, structure-function relationship and genetic inheritance, but have not yet applied those concepts in plant systems. We will adopt a molecular and chemical approach as we explore various concepts in plant biology including plant metabolism, structure-function, development, genetics, pathology and taxonomy. The course will be composed of 9.5, 1-week modules.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2027
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    BIOL 42A - Section 1: Physiology - Section 1
    Instructor: Maria Miara
    Prerequisites: BIOL 14A and BIOL 15B. CHEM 25A and 25B are recommended.
    Course Description: Physiology, according to American Physiological Society, is the study of life, and how genes, cells, tissues, and organisms function. Physiologists are occupied with research on key physiological concepts of body systems function. The investigation of living systems at many levels includes molecular processes, cell function, and behavior of isolated tissues, organ systems and the whole organism. The physiologists work is not limited to cell and tissue culture and animal experiments but includes research in human subjects.  Physiological studies of normal function provide the basis to understanding abnormal function that occurs in pathological states. Physiologists are always trying to understand the functional body responses to a variety of internal and external environmental challenges.  In this context the physiology course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the function and regulation of organ systems and integration of all systems in the human body. In addition, the importance of mechanisms of communication and control/ regulation to integrate all organ systems to maintain the homeostasis will be emphasized. Course content will include principles of homeostasis, neural & hormonal control mechanisms, sensory systems, muscle physiology, bone physiology, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and metabolism, renal, endocrine, reproductive, and immune systems.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2394
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit: 40 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    BIOL 42A - Section 2: Physiology - Section 2
    Instructor: Maria Miara
    Prerequisites: BIOL 14A and BIOL 15B. CHEM 25A and 25B are recommended.
    Course Description: Physiology, according to American Physiological Society, is the study of life, and how genes, cells, tissues, and organisms function. Physiologists are occupied with research on key physiological concepts of body systems function. The investigation of living systems at many levels includes molecular processes, cell function, and behavior of isolated tissues, organ systems and the whole organism. The physiologists work is not limited to cell and tissue culture and animal experiments but includes research in human subjects.  Physiological studies of normal function provide the basis to understanding abnormal function that occurs in pathological states. Physiologists are always trying to understand the functional body responses to a variety of internal and external environmental challenges.  In this context the physiology course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the function and regulation of organ systems and integration of all systems in the human body. In addition, the importance of mechanisms of communication and control/ regulation to integrate all organ systems to maintain the homeostasis will be emphasized. Course content will include principles of homeostasis, neural & hormonal control mechanisms, sensory systems, muscle physiology, bone physiology, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and metabolism, renal, endocrine, reproductive, and immune systems.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2442
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit: 40 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    BISC 10B: The Biology of Women's Health
    Instructor: Melissa Kosinski-Collins
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: Does not meet the requirements for the major in Biology. This online course is designed for students who are interested in learning the basic biology of women’s health. Diseases such as HPV, breast cancer, and Zika are global health concerns. Have you ever wondered why certain diseases seem to impact women more often than men? How are they diagnosed and when? Vaccinations, screenings and treatments exist for some of these diseases, but are they effective? What are the normal physiological processes that happen in the human body and how are these affected by pregnancy? What are the ethical concerns related to these diseases and treatments? How do they work and what are the ethical concerns? We will explore the molecular, genetic, medical and clinical basis of several diseases impacting women’s health. We will conduct laboratories looking at viral structure and assembly, model clinical procedures for diagnosis, and begin to develop an understanding of how governmental policy is designed surrounding these concerns.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2110
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    BISC 11A: Biodiversity Connections
    Instructor: Colleen Hitchcock
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: This online course explores the evolution, extinction, and conservation of biodiversity for students majoring in disciplines beyond the sciences. Students leaving this course will have a firm grasp of the scientific method, the benefits and limitations of scientific conclusions and the interplay between science and society. In the online environment we will explore topics through a variety of formats to promote both instructor lead and peer facilitated learning. It is impossible to explore biodiversity without promoting bioliteracy of the flora and fauna local to students. This is course will introduce students to digital species identification tools and make use of iNaturalist (www.iNaturalist.org). iNaturalist is a worldwide citizen science platform that enables users to build naturalist skills and connect with a local community of naturalists while at the same time providing worldwide data on species distribution to the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (www.gbif.org) and Encyclopedia of Life (www.eol.org). Given the online structure of this course and presumed varied geographic location of students, complementing our work with this citizen science experience will enable students to have a place-based experience and develop lifelong naturalist skills. In addition, it will offer insights to non-majors on the type of science contributions they can make now and in the future.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2028
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit: 12 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    BUS 71A: Introduction to Finance
    Instructor: Yaxuan Wen
    Prerequisites: BUS 6a. This course cannot be counted as an elective toward the Economics major or minor.
    Course Description: Introduces students to topics and methods in the field of finance. Covers how firms secure financing via equity and debt markets, valuation of stocks and bonds, fundamental analysis techniques, capital budgeting techniques, relationship of risk and return, and the time-value-of-money.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:50pm - 4:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2132
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: DL, SS
    Enrollment Limit: 25 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    BUS 211F: Analyzing Big Data I (2 credits) - July 7-July 23
    Instructor: To Be Announced
    Prerequisites: Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
    Course Description: Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. Class meets Tue/Thur from 10:00am to 12:50pm from July 7 to July 23, 2020) Surveys quantitative techniques and computer tools in management information systems including database manipulation. Objective of the course is to help students acquire advanced computer skills through cases and hands-on applications.
    Session: IBS Session II
    Day: T, TH
    Time: 10:00am - 12:50pm
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2141
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled:
    Enrollment Limit: 40
    Course Classification: Available for Graduate Credit
    Course Tuition: $1,957 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    BUS 240F: Information Visualization (2 credits - July 28-Aug. 13, 2020)
    Instructor: To Be Announced
    Prerequisites: BUS 211f, or the equivalent. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
    Course Description: Class meets Tue/Thur from 10:00am to 12:50pm from July 28-Aug. 13, 2020. Modern computer graphics provide many ways to tame "big data," allowing users not only to view multidimensional information, but to interactively explore, combine, and interpret massive volumes of information using software tools including R, Microstrategy and Tableau
    Session: IBS Session II
    Day: T, TH
    Time: 10:00am - 12:50pm
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2142
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled:
    Enrollment Limit: 40
    Course Classification: Available for Graduate Credit
    Course Tuition: $1,957 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    CHEM 11A: General Chemistry I
    Instructor: Rebecca Meeks
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: Covers a wide array of topics, embracing aspects of descriptive, as well as quantitative, chemistry. No prior study of chemistry is assumed, as the course begins by looking at the atomic foundation of matter, the elements, and the organization of the periodic table, working its way up to studying how atoms are bonded together to form larger units of matter. Students who complete this course will have an understanding of the three major phases of matter—solids, liquids, and gases—and how they behave, as well as a knowledge of the major types of chemical reactions and how to represent them. A strong focus is put on learning methods of creative problem-solving—using the material as a way to develop creative approaches to solving unfamiliar problems—a skill that carries students far beyond the confines of the classroom. The corresponding lab is CHEM 18A but this lab will not be offered in Summer 2020.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 8:30am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2007
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    CHEM 11B: General Chemistry II
    Instructor: Michael Vela
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 11a or an approved equivalent. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have passed CHEM 15b in previous years. Four class hours and one sixty-minute structured study group session per week. The corresponding lab is CHEM 18b however the Lab course will not be offered in Summer 2020.
    Course Description: Chemistry 11B picks up where Chemistry 11A left off, advancing students’ understanding of bonding models and molecular structure. Three major quantitative topics are covered in the second half of General Chemistry—chemical equilibrium (including acid-base chemistry, solubility), chemical kinetics, and thermodynamics. Electrochemistry and oxidation-reduction reactions are also covered in 11B. When taken in conjunction with Chemistry 11A and the associated lab courses (Chemistry 18A and 18B), this course meets the general, analytic, and inorganic requirements of medical, dental, and veterinary schools.Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in Chemistry 11A or an approved equivalent.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 8:30am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2038
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    CHEM 25A: Organic Chemistry I
    Instructor: Stephanie Murray
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 11b or 15b or the equivalent. CHEM 25a honors option involves a separate recitation and permission of the instructor to enroll. Students in the honors section will receive a note on their transcript designating the class "Honors Organic Chemistry."
    Course Description: Structure, reactions, preparations, and uses of the compounds of carbon.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 8:30am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2002
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    CHEM 25B: Organic Chemistry II
    Instructor: Mustafa Yatin
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 25a or its equivalent. CHEM 25b honors option involves a separate recitation and permission of the instructor to enroll. Students in the honors section will receive a note on their transcript designating the class "Honors Organic Chemistry."
    Course Description: CHEM 25B is a continuation of CHEM 25A. This course meets the second half of the organic chemistry requirement for chemistry, biology, premedical, and pre-dental majors when taken in conjunction with the laboratory course CHEM 29B. The course will build upon concepts of structure and reactivity from CHEM 25A. Much emphasis will be placed on the chemistry of carbonyl compounds, and other biologically relevant molecules such as carbohydrates. Organic compounds of chemical, medicinal, and biological interest will be examined through current literature examples. The multi-step synthetic pathways will be explained by sequences of elementary mechanistic steps to describe a large number of reactions. We will particularly emphasize the green chemistry principles in the context of organic reactions and experiments.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 8:30am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2040
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    COSI 10A: Introduction to Problem Solving in Python
    Instructor: Antonella DiLillo
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: Open only to students with no previous programing background. Students may not take COSI 10a if they have received a satisfactory grade in COSI 12b or COSI 21a. May not be taken for credit by students who took COSI 11a in prior years. Does not meet the requirements for the major or minor in Computer Science. This course introduces computer programming and related computer science principles. Through programming, students will develop fundamental skills such as abstract reasoning and problem solving. Students will master programming techniques using the Python programming language and will develop good program design methodology resulting in correct, robust, and maintainable programs
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2010
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN, DL
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $100
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    COSI 12B: Advanced Programming Techniques in Java
    Instructor: Michael Golitsyn
    Prerequisites: COSI 10A or successful completion of the COSI online placement exam.
    Course Description: Studies advanced programming concepts and techniques utilizing the Java programming language. The course covers software engineering concepts, object-oriented design, design patterns and professional best practices. This is a required foundation course that will prepare you for more advanced courses, new programming languages, and frameworks.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2422
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN, DL
    Enrollment Limit: 999
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $100
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    COSI 21A: Data Structures and the Fundamentals of Computing
    Instructor: Antonella DiLillo
    Prerequisites: COSI 11a and either COSI 12b or permission from the Undergraduate Advising Head or Graduate Program Director.
    Course Description: This course focuses on the design and analysis of algorithms and the use of data structures. Through the introduction of the most widely used data structures employed in solving commonly encountered problems (e.g. lists, trees, and graphs), students will learn different ways to organize data for easy access and efficient manipulation. Algorithms to solve classic problems (e.g. searching, sorting, hashing, graph algorithms, etc.) will be presented, as well as classic algorithm design strategies (e.g. divide-and-conquer and greedy algorithms). Computational complexity theory will be introduced for studying the efficiency of the algorithms covered in the course.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:10am - 1:10pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2012
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN, DL
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $100
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    COSI 131A: Operating Systems
    Instructor: Iraklis Tsekourakis
    Prerequisites: COSI 21a. May not be taken for credit by students who took COSI 31a in prior years.
    Course Description: Fundamental structures of a computer system from hardware abstractions through machine and assembly language, to the overall structure of an operating system and key resource management abstractions.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:10am - 1:10pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2432
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: DL, SN
    Enrollment Limit: 40 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $100
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    COSI 152A: Web Application Development
    Instructor: Timothy Hickey
    Prerequisites: COSI 12B
    Course Description: An introduction to web programming that covers the fundamental languages and tools, including HTML/CSS for page layout, javascript/ajax for client-side integration, and server-side programming in javascript using Node/Express and MongoDB. The course also discusses security, scaling/optimization, and multi-tier architectures.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:10am - 1:10pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2427
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $100
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    COSI 153A: Mobile Application Development
    Instructor: Timothy Hickey
    Prerequisites: COSI 12B
    Course Description: Introduces the design and analysis of mobile applications that covers the architecture of mobile devices, APIs for graphical user interfaces on mobile devices, location-aware computing, social networking. Also covers the theory and practice of space and time optimization for these relatively small and slow devices. We will use the React-Native framework to build Mobile Apps.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2423
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: $100
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 2A: A Survey of Economics
    Instructor: Qi He
    Prerequisites: None. Intended for students who are not Economics majors or minors. May not be taken for credit by students who took ECON 10a in prior years.
    Course Description: An introduction to micro- and macroeconomics. The course is intended for students who wantto learn essential economic tools used in a variety of contexts, such as managerial decisions and public policy design. We will develop intuitions for economic models and will study their real world applications. The history of economic thought will be introduced and discussed throughout the course. For students who eventually choose to take further economics courses,this course will prepare them with the theoretical tools and knowledge of economic terminology to be successful.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:50pm - 4:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2043
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 20A: Introduction to Macroeconomics
    Instructor: Zhenyu Gong
    Prerequisites: ECON 2a with a B+ or higher or ECON 10a. May not be taken for credit by students concurrently with or after they have taken ECON 82b.
    Course Description: This course provides an overview of macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, inflation and interest rate, employment and unemployment, government expenditure and taxation, the role of the banking system, monetary policy and fiscal policy. Important policy debates such as, the sub-prime crisis, social security, and the public debt will be discussed. The course introduces basic principles and models of macroeconomics to analyze the modern society economic problems.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2042
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit: 35
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 10A: Introduction to Microeconomics
    Instructor: Kyeongah Lee
    Prerequisites: Intended for Economics majors and minors or students who intend to take more than one Economics course. Students who have taken ECON 2a and received a B+ or better cannot receive credit for this course. May not be taken for credit by students concurrently with or after they have taken ECON 80a.
    Course Description: This is the first economics course that students planning to major or minor in economics should start with this course. This course will introduce students to basic economic principles and tools that evaluate economic behavior or decisions. This will cover consumer's choice, firm's choice, and market equilibrium. Students will be able to apply the theoretical tools to economic behavior or public policy issues.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:50pm - 4:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2013
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS, QR
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 151A - Section 1: Statistical Modeling with R for Economics and Finance - Section 1
    Instructor: Mark McAvoy
    Prerequisites: ECON 83a
    Course Description: Introduces students to statistical modeling using R, with applications to real-world issues in economics and finance. Topics include: describing data; computing of probability; data generation; Markov-Monte Carlo methods and Bayesian linear regression. Teaches the basics of programming in R, including how to write functions, store and manage data, and produce data visualizations.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2137
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 151A - Section 2: Statistical Modeling with R for Economics and Finance - Section 2
    Instructor: Mark McAvoy
    Prerequisites: ECON 83a
    Course Description: Introduces students to statistical modeling using R, with applications to real-world issues in economics and finance. Topics include: describing data; computing of probability; data generation; Markov-Monte Carlo methods and Bayesian linear regression. Teaches the basics of programming in R, including how to write functions, store and manage data, and produce data visualizations.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2457
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 171A: Financial Economics
    Instructor: Anne Laski
    Prerequisites: ECON 80a and ECON 83a or permission of the instructor.
    Course Description: The course covers topics related to financial economics, including investors’ attitudes toward risk, capital allocation, portfolio selection, asset pricing models (Capital Asset Pricing Model and Arbitrage Pricing Theory), the efficient market hypothesis, fixed income markets, equity valuation, and options and futures markets. Lectures will consist of covering the theory, going over in-class examples, and class discussion. Problem sets will focus on applying the material from lectures. Students will also be required to complete a session project. Students should have a basic understanding of microeconomics, statistics, and algebra. If you are enrolling in an upper-level Economics course this summer, please contact Leslie Yancich, the ECON Department administrator, lesliey@brandeis.edu, for an enrollment code. Permission to waive the ECON 83A is contingent upon students’ writing and passing an entrance exam in statistics prior the beginning of classes.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2428
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 202A: Applied International Macroeconomics - July 7-Aug. 21 (Undergraduates receive credit for ECON 161a: International Finance)
    Instructor: Karen Smith
    Prerequisites: ECON 82b
    Course Description: Class meets Tue/Thur from 2:00pm to 4:50pm from July 7 to Aug. 21. Using countries to illustrate, this course covers domestic and international macroeconomics. Topics include the goals and functioning of monetary authorities, financial crises, international competitiveness and PPP, exchange rate regimes, hyperinflation, and the sustainability of government finances. Students also master basic skills for manipulating and presenting macroeconomic information.
    Session: IBS Session II
    Day: T, TH
    Time: 2:00pm - 4:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2143
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled:
    Enrollment Limit: 40
    Course Classification: Available for Graduate Credit
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 25A: Oral Communication in Economics Practicum
    Instructor: Galit Eizman
    Prerequisites: ECON 80a. Course may be taken as a corequisite. Yields half-course credit.
    Course Description: Is the government the “problem or the solution”? Is minimum wage necessary or might lead to unemployment? Should our generation invest money and resources in solving global warming for the next generations or refuse to carry a financial burden which is not ours? Does foreign aid improve or maintain the economic status of underdeveloped countries? Should the retirement age be higher? Are students’ loans a “ticking bomb”? Economics theories and practices, as established in Micro and Macro economics courses, are designed to discuss these debates from a scientific point of view, theoretical and empirical analysis based. Yet- if all learning and understanding cannot be communicated well to the public, decision makers, policy and practice figures, managers and businessman, it will be almost impossible to make a use of this knowledge to benefit the world. Moreover, many academic people are communicating to very narrow audience who can understand their terminology and concepts, graphs and equations, while struggling to translate these concepts and bring their ideas to the public or people with no prior detailed knowledge in this field. This course is designed to establish your abilities to be an excellent public speaker, develop and improve your public speaking and communication skills. By the end of this course you should feel a clear and visible improvement in your public speaking and oral communication skills. Leaders, researchers and academics must have the ability to communicate clearly and persuasively, as well as analyze thoughtfully. This course is designed for potential leaders mostly in economics, as well as business, international relations, computer science, mathematics, politics and public policy. Its goal is to strengthen your capacity to present well your academic and scientific knowledge, speaking your ideas and concepts with authenticity, eloquence, and authority. The course emphasizes how to express your knowledgeable voice, shape your economics speaking persona, and work with effective elements of persuasion. Speaking assignments require students to develop important messages that combine substance, passion, and commitment. Students will stand in front of their class giving brief speeches, taking questions, and receiving and, in turn, giving feedback. The speeches will be available as streamed video on the course webpage for later review. This course is consists of four strands that run concurrently: Instruction (I), Feedback (F), Practice (P), Revision (R). The course plan include: - Full-class lecture/discussions focus on critical aspects of public speaking in the context of economics (I);- Sections, which divide the class into assigned working groups, are the occasions for students to hone their speaking skills (P). Students will receive detailed feedback from their peers, the instructor and will also able to evaluate themselves (F). - Readings and video clips bring greater breadth and depth to students’ understanding of the principles and characteristics of excellent and genuine public speaking. Students are required to read relevant materials and watch instructive videos to improve their knowledge base about communication skills (I);- Mandatory and optional workshops as opportunities for replay, impromptu speaking, and experimentation (P and R). This course differs from other classes in focusing exclusively on speeches and presentations in the field of microeconomics. Course structure summary: Class sessions include: a baseline presentations workshop, lecture/discussion, mandatory workshops Optional open workshops: during these optional open workshops, students are invited to deliver extra speeches, re-do speeches given previously in required workshops and practice impromptu speaking.
    Session: Session I
    Day: T, F
    Time: 7:00am - 9:00am
    Credit Hours: 2 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2459
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: OC
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 28B - Section 1: The Global Economy - Section 1
    Instructor: Mohammed AlMehdar
    Prerequisites: ECON 2a or ECON 10a and ECON 20a. ECON 20a may be taken concurrently with ECON 28b.
    Course Description: Applies the basic tools and models of economic analysis to a wide range of topics in micro-, macro-, and international economics.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2029
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 28B - Section 2: The Global Economy - Section 2
    Instructor: Mohammed AlMehdar
    Prerequisites: ECON 2a or ECON 10a and ECON 20a. ECON 20a may be taken concurrently with ECON 28b.
    Course Description: Applies the basic tools and models of economic analysis to a wide range of topics in micro-, macro-, and international economics.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2467
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 80A - Section 1: Microeconomic Theory - Section 1 in Session 2
    Instructor: Hyongse Yoo
    Prerequisites: ECON 10a. Students must earn C- or higher in MATH 10a, or otherwise satisfy the calculus requirement, to enroll in this course.
    Course Description: The objective of this course is to develop intermediate level microeconomic knowledge and problem-solving skills. The topics would be similar to basic level microeconomics class. However, the way topics are dealt with are mathematical and the focus is more on problemsolving skills. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to apply the mathematical skills to explain real world problems. If you are interested in enrolling in an upper-level Economics course (ECON 80 and above), please contact Leslie Yancich, the ECON Department administrator, lesliey@brandeis.edu, for a consent code. She will confirm that you have satisfied the course prerequisites.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:10am - 1:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2044
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 80A - Section 2: Microeconomic Theory - Section 2 in Session 1
    Instructor: Karen Smith
    Prerequisites: ECON 10a. Students must earn C- or higher in MATH 10a, or otherwise satisfy the calculus requirement, to enroll in this course.
    Course Description: This course takes a very interactive, application-based approach to understanding Microeconomic Theory. Your journey will begin with interpretation of the significance of decision-making by (1) individuals, (2) firms, and (3) the interaction of these agents in the marketplace. This course will equip you with rigorous foundational analytical tools required to model these three components of Microeconomic Theory. You will be guided through a sequential approach beginning with an exploration and construction of consumer preferences and utility functions, followed by a consideration of firms and production functions, and ending with an analysis of market-clearing conditions. All of this would be taught with emphasis on ‘bringing the theory to life’ so be prepared to develop and assert your research and policy-making skills! Microeconomic Theory is an essential tool for all students interested in exploring Economics and Economic decision making in their future academic career. It promises to not only sharpen your analytical skills, but provide you with a sound frame of reference to understand and incorporate many other aspects of Economic Theory. Students should contact Leslie Yancich, the ECON Department administrator, lesliey@brandeis.edu, for a Consent Code to enroll in this class in SAGE. She will verify that you have completed course prerequisites to enroll.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2395
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit: 20 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 82B - Section 1: Macroeconomic Theory
    Instructor: Oriana Montti
    Prerequisites: ECON 20a. Students must earn a C- or higher in MATH 10a, or otherwise satisfy the calculus requirement, to enroll in this course.
    Course Description: This course will cover principles of macroeconomic theory, measurement of main economic aggregates and the role of policy interventions. Topics covered include determinants of economic growth, business cycles, money, recessions, and the international economy. Measurement includes relevant variables from national accounts such as income, consumption and investment; interest rates, exchange rates, inflation, and the unemployment rate. It will also cover the effects of fiscal and monetary policy and promote the analysis of current economic events. Students should contact Leslie Yancich, the ECON Department administrator, lesliey@brandeis.edu, for a Consent Code to enroll in this class in SAGE. She will verify that you have completed course prerequisites to enroll.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2014
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 82B - Section 2: Macroeconomic Theory
    Instructor: Amanda Guimbeau
    Prerequisites: ECON 20a. Students must earn a C- or higher in MATH 10a, or otherwise satisfy the calculus requirement, to enroll in this course.
    Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the concepts and measurements of economic aggregates, such as: consumption, investment, national income, and economy-wide variables such as interest rates, exchange rates, unemployment rate, and inflation. Important topics are covered to ensure that students obtain a clear understanding of the key determinants of a country’s national income; of how the availability of labor and capital affect standard of living, and how technological progress can result in higher growth rates. They also learn about the key determinants of unemployment and inflation rates, and how fiscal and monetary policies affect these macroeconomic variables. Two semesters of introductory economics (Econ 2a or 10a or 20a) are prerequisites for this course. It is also assumed that students know univariate calculus (at the level of Math 10a). Students should contact Leslie Yancich, the ECON Department administrator, lesliey@brandeis.edu, for a Consent Code to enroll in this class in SAGE. She will verify that you have completed course prerequisites to enroll.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH, F
    Time: 1:50pm - 3:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2458
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ECON 83A: Statistics for Economic Analysis
    Instructor: Yaxuan Wen
    Prerequisites: ECON 2a or 10a. Students must earn a C- or higher in MATH 10a, or otherwise satisfy the calculus requirement, to enroll in this course.
    Course Description: This is the first course in probability and statistics. It is designed to provide a working knowledge of the analytical tools for economic analysis. Topics to be covered include descriptive statistics, sampling and sampling distributions, the Central Limit Theorem, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. The course will conclude with an introduction to regression analysis. Coding examples and exercises will be incorporated throughout the course. Students should contact Leslie Yancich, the ECON Department administrator, lesliey@brandeis.edu, for a Consent Code to enroll in this class in SAGE. She will verify that you have completed course prerequisites to enroll.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 6:30pm - 9:00pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2045
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS, DL, QR
    Enrollment Limit: 20 Students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ENG 126B: Joyce's Ulysses
    Instructor: David Sherman
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: This seminar is an opportunity to become absorbed in Joyce’s Ulysses as a member of an interpretive community. Published in 1922, this novel has impacted modern literature like no other. A novel at the edge of the genre of the novel, Ulysses is a highly experimental, weirdly delightful, and encyclopedic world-making project. We will explore it chapter by chapter, with parallel readings of Homer and other intertexts. We will also consider the place of Ulysses in modernism, the explosive cultural project across the arts in the early 20th century that is still with us. Our intensive, collaborative approach to Ulysses will serve different needs for each student, based on individual academic and creative commitments; this book is a powerful resource for all of them.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:10am - 1:10pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2452
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: WI, HUM
    Enrollment Limit: 20 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ENG 147A: Film Noir
    Instructor: William Flesch
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: A study of classics of the genre (The Killers, The Maltese Falcon, Touch of Evil) as well as more recent variations (Chinatown, Bladerunner). Readings include source fiction (Hemingway, Hammett) and essays in criticism and theory.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:10am - 1:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2047
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: HUM
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ENG 180A: The Modern American Short Story
    Instructor: William Flesch
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: This is a course on reading American short stories, mainly stories less than twenty pages long, some only a page long, though we may occasionally do longer ones. We'll do two or three stories per class (since these are longer summer school classes). We'll definitely do stories by Poe, Hemingway, Flannery O'Connor, J.D. Salinger, and Joy Williams, but most of the syllabus will be based on student interest and desire. In the past we've done detective fiction, magical realism, science fiction -- whatever is worth thinking about at length. Summer gives us maximum flexibility in what we read, and the course aims to be be serious fun.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2048
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: HUM
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    ENG 79A: Screenwriting Workshop: Beginning Screenplay
    Instructor: Marc Weinberg
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: Offered exclusively on a credit/no credit basis. There's never been a better time to become a screenwriter. Breakthroughs in technology, production, and distribution have heightened the demand for good scripts. Whether you want to write a micro-budget indie or a Hollywood blockbuster, this course provides all the essential tools you’ll need. Learn the fundamentals – structure, story arc, character development – and develop the first act of your feature screenplay. You’ll also watch and analyze recent movies. Join us for a creative, low-pressure course over five weeks, and you’ll never look at a movie the same way again!
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:50pm - 4:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2015
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: HUM, WI, OC, DL
    Enrollment Limit: 16
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    FA 3A - Section 1: Introduction to Drawing I
    Instructor: Alfredo Gisholt
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: Beginning-level course. No previous drawing experience necessary. May be repeated once for credit if taught by different instructors. A studio class that introduces a range of drawing materials and methods, intended for both studio majors and non-majors. Students will draw from direct observation of still-life, landscape, and the human figure. Drawing media may include graphite, charcoal, ink, and collage, as well as watercolor and pastel. The drawings of great artists throughout history will be studied to provide examples of what is possible within this broad and expressive visual language. Students are expected to order and purchase supplies for the course as we will not be physically meeting in an art studio on campus. The list of supplies for purchase may be found here: https://www.dickblick.com/lists/blicku/081F87GUP140B/publicview/
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 6:30pm - 9:00pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2016
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: CA
    Enrollment Limit: 16
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None - students will need to purchase their own art supplies
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    FA 3A - Section 2: Introduction to Drawing I
    Instructor: Alfredo Gisholt
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: Beginning-level course. No previous drawing experience necessary. May be repeated once for credit if taught by different instructors. A studio class that introduces a range of drawing materials and methods, intended for both studio majors and non-majors. Students will draw from direct observation of still-life, landscape, and the human figure. Drawing media may include graphite, charcoal, ink, and collage, as well as watercolor and pastel. The drawings of great artists throughout history will be studied to provide examples of what is possible within this broad and expressive visual language. Students are expected to order and purchase supplies for the course as we will not be physically meeting in an art studio on campus. The list of supplies for purchase may be found here: https://www.dickblick.com/lists/blicku/081F87GUP140B/publicview/
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 6:30pm - 9:00pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2447
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: CA
    Enrollment Limit: 16 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None - students will need to purchase their own art supplies
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    FA 4A: Sculpture Foundation: 3-D Design I
    Instructor: Catherine Della Lucia
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: This course is a beginner level exploration of three-dimensional aspects of form, space, and composition utilizing a variety of materials and sculptural techniques. It emphasizes students' inventing of images and objects through the use of modern materials and contemporary ideas about sculpture. Assignments are based on abstract thought, material exploration, and problem solving. Students will create 3 sculptures through the processes of clay modeling, wood fabrication, cardboard construction, and plaster and alginate casting. The intent of this course is to give students a rich studio experience and promote a fresh and meaningful approach to visual concepts.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:50pm - 4:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2017
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: CA
    Enrollment Limit: 12
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None - students will need to purchase their own art supplies
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    FIN 201A: Investments (undergraduates receive credit for ECON 171 Financial Economics)
    Instructor: Hyongse Yoo
    Prerequisites: ECON 80a and ECON 83a or permission of the instructor.
    Course Description: Course meets Wed & Fri 10:00AM-12:50PM from July 7 to Aug. 21. Covers topics related to financial economics, including investors' attitudes toward risk, capital allocation, portfolio selection, asset pricing models (Capital Asset Pricing Model and the Arbitrage Pricing Theory), the efficient market hypothesis, fixed income markets, equity valuation, and options and futures markets.
    Session: IBS Session II
    Day: W, F
    Time: 10:00am - 12:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2407
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled:
    Enrollment Limit: 40
    Course Classification: Available for Graduate Credit
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    FIN 212A: Accounting and Financial Analysis - July 7-Aug 21 (undergraduates receive credit for BUS 6a: Financial Accounting)
    Instructor: To Be Announced
    Prerequisites: ECON 2a or ECON 10a
    Course Description: Class meets Tue/Thur from 10:00am to 12:50pm from July 7 to Aug. 21. Develops a fundamental understanding of financial accounting and corporate reporting issues. Students will be exposed to a variety of real world applications involving for profit financial statements. More specifically, students will acquire skills allowing them to read, interpret and analyze the income statement, balance sheet and the statement of cash flows. This course will primarily address accounting standards employed in the US (GAAP) but will acquaint students with international standards (IFRS) used by other countries in numerous accounting areas. Further, issues related to the project on the convergence of standards currently being conducted by the FASB and IASB will be discussed. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on interpreting financial statements to understand how accounting information, in a variety of decision settings, can be utilized by managers.
    Session: IBS Session II
    Day: T, TH
    Time: 10:00am - 12:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2405
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled:
    Enrollment Limit: 40
    Course Classification: Available for Graduate Credit
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    GECS 188B: Human/Nature: European Perspectives on Climate Change
    Instructor: Sabine von Mering
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: This class aims to introduce you to the global problem of climate change and proposed solutions through the lens of the humanities, highlighting German/European perspectives. You will leave this class with an understanding of the specific historical trajectory of German and European responses to environmental challenges in general and climate change and climate justice in particular, and how these responses are different from and also in conversation with those in the US and in other countries around the globe. You will learn about the connection between ethics and aesthetics and recognize how forms of humanistic inquiry like documentary film, nature writing, and ecocriticism complement scientific, artistic, and journalistic work, providing much needed critical reflection of the socio-political and economic processes affecting humanity today. In your own written responses, op-eds, oral presentations, and in the final group projects you will use what you have learned and harness your own creativity to explore new avenues for change inspired by European artists, scientists, entrepreneurs, artivists [!] and activists.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 7:00pm - 9:00pm
    Credit Hours:
    Sage Class Number: 2446
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: DJW, HUM, OC, WI
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Available for Graduate Credit
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    HIST 56B: World History to 1960
    Instructor: Alexander Herbert
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: An introductory survey of world history, from the dawn of ‘civilization’ to c. 1960. Upon completion of this course, students should able to demonstrate knowledge of the following historical processes in world history: (i) the establishment and rivalry of political communities, (ii) the development of material life, and (iii) the historical formation of cultural identities. They should be able to compare and contrast these processes across different macroregions (E. Asia, S. Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, Europe, N. America, and S. America), and explain how the operation of these historical processes has, and has not, changed over the centuries covered by the course.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:10am - 1:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2456
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS, DJW, NW
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    HSSP 114B: Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care
    Instructor: Jessica Santos
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: The environments where we live, learn, work, play, and pray shape our day-to-day lives and long-term health and wellbeing in complex ways. Dr. Anthony Iton, Senior Vice President for Healthy Communities at the California Endowment, famously said “tell me your zip code and I’ll tell you your life expectancy.” This course lays a theoretical and empirical foundation for students interested in understanding how social factors (poverty, community context, work environments, etc.) affect the health and wellbeing of racial and ethnic minorities and other vulnerable populations in the United States. Students will develop tools to analyze epidemiological patterns of health status by race/ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic status. In addition, students will learn how structural factors (racism, segregation, gender hierarchies, dominant cultural norms within health systems and organizations, and their intersections) contribute to health disparities, and how policies and practices inside and outside of the healthcare system are advancing health equity.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2444
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    IGS 10A: Introduction to International and Global Studies
    Instructor: Chandler Rosenberger
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: "Globalization" touches us more every day. This class introduces students to the historical origins of globalization, then addresses the challenges of globalization to national and international governance, economic success, individual and group identities, cultural diversity, and the environment.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2030
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS, DL
    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    INT 92g: Undergraduate Summer Internship
    Instructor: Alyssa Stalsberg Canelli
    Prerequisites: Summer Internships must go through an approval process before regiistration. This can be found at: https://www.brandeis.edu/summer/registration/brandeis-students/int-92g.html
    Course Description: The purpose of this course is to help students to think critically about the organization and industry in which they are currently interning, while developing and articulating their personal narrative. Students will use their assignments and reflections to analyze their internship experience and articulate their academic, professional and personal goals, motivations and values. Through this process, students build their own meta-awareness about their learning process and how to extend it in the future. Students will also benefit from the collective learning of their peers. The activities and assignments for this course have been developed using active and reflective learning in order to help students maximize their internship experience.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 1 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2031
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled:
    Enrollment Limit: 50
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $500 (+$50 Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    MATH 8A: Introduction to Probability and Statistics
    Instructor: Jiajie Zheng
    Prerequisites:
    Course Description: Discrete probability spaces, random variables, expectation, variance, approximation by the normal curve, sample mean and variance, and confidence intervals. Does not require calculus; only high school algebra and graphing of functions.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:10am - 1:10pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2051
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    MATH 10A: Techniques of Calculus (a)
    Instructor: McKee Krumpak
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade of C- or higher in MATH 5a or placement by examination. Students may not take MATH 10a if they have received a satisfactory grade in MATH 10b or MATH 20a.
    Course Description: Introduction to differential (and some integral) calculus of one variable, with emphasis on techniques and applications
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 1:50pm - 3:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2018
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    MATH 10B: Techniques of Calculus (b)
    Instructor: Zach Larsen
    Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade of C- or higher in MATH 10a or placement by examination. Continuation of 10a. Students may not take MATH 10a and MATH 10b simultaneously. Students may not take MATH 10b if they have received a satisfactory grade in MATH 20a.
    Course Description: Introduction to integral calculus of one variable with emphasis on techniques and applications
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 1:50pm - 3:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2049
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    MATH 15A: Applied Linear Algebra
    Instructor: Kewen Wang
    Prerequisites: MATH 5a and permission of the instructor, placement by examination, or any mathematics course numbered 10 or above. Students may take MATH 15a or 22a for credit, but not both.
    Course Description: Matrices, determinants, linear equations, vector spaces, eigenvalues, quadratic forms, linear programming. Emphasis on techniques and applications.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2019
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    MATH 20A: Multi-variable Calculus
    Instructor: Qing Liu
    Prerequisites: MATH 10a and b and MATH 15a, or placement by examination. Students may take Math 20a or 22b for credit, but not both. Students may not take MATH 10a or 10b or 15a concurrently with MATH 20a.
    Course Description: Among the topics treated are functions of several variables, vector-valued functions, partial derivatives and multiple integrals, extremum problems, line and surface integrals, Green's and Stokes's theorems. Emphasis on techniques and applications.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 9:00am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2050
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    MATH 36A: Probability
    Instructor: Eric Hanson
    Prerequisites: MATH 20a or 22b.
    Course Description: Sample spaces and probability measures, elementary combinatorial examples. Conditional probability. Random variables, expectations, variance, distribution and density functions. Independence and correlation. Chebychev's inequality and the weak law of large numbers. Central limit theorem. Markov and Poisson processes.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 1:50pm - 3:50pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2020
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    MATH 37A: Differential Equations
    Instructor: Denis Patterson
    Prerequisites: MATH 15a or 22a and MATH 20a or 22b.
    Course Description: Differential equations is an essential topic in applied mathematics as many (if not most) important models in the physical and social sciences are expressed as differential equations. However, most practically useful differential equation-based models do not omit solutions that can be expressed in terms of elementary functions. Thus we typically try to classify solutions in terms of their key properties. For instance, what is the long-run behavior of the solutions to a given equation? Is there a unique solution? How does the behavior of the solution change as parameters are varied? This course will introduce students to the core techniques needed to qualitatively analyze the solutions of simple differential equations in low dimensions. Since it is often useful to compute numerical approximations to solutions we will also cover some basic techniques to numerically solve differential equations.We will illustrate our techniques by analyzing models from a variety of applied fields such as population dynamics, epidemiology (the SIR model), physics (Hooke's Law) and ecology (vegetation models from my own research).The main topics of the course will be: 1. First order DEs, 2. First order systems, 3. Linear systems, 4. Oscillations, 5. Nonlinear systems. Additionally, we will discuss and implement some simple schemes to solve differential equations numerically - these lessons will be integrated into the main topics.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:10am - 1:10pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2424
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    MATH 39A: Introduction to Combinatorics
    Instructor: Olivier Bernardi
    Prerequisites: COSI 29a, MATH 23b, or permission of the instructor.
    Course Description: Combinatorics is a central branch of mathematics concerned with the description and analysis of discrete data structures, such as graphs, lattice paths, finite groups, etc. The goal of the course is to learn some concepts and methods in combinatorics. We will cover subjects in both graph theory (trees, colorings, flows and matchings), and enumeration (permutations and combinations, inclusion-exclusion, generating functions).
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 11:10am - 1:10pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2046
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    PHIL 6A: Introduction to Symbolic Logic
    Instructor: Casey Rufener
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: An introduction to the formal methods of studying deductive arguments. We will learn natural deduction for both propositional and predicate logic.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:50pm - 4:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2033
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: HUM
    Enrollment Limit: 20 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    PHIL 131A: Philosophy of Mind
    Instructor: Casey Rufener
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: Covers the central issue in the philosophy of mind: the mind-body problem. This is the ongoing attempt to understand the relation between our minds -- our thoughts, perceptions, feelings, and so on -- and our bodies. Is the mind just a complex configuration of (neural) matter, or is there something about it that's irreducibly different from every physical thing? Topics include intentionality, consciousness, functionalism, reductionism, and the philosophical implications of recent work in neuroscience, cognitive science, and artificial intelligence.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 1:50pm - 4:20pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2032
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: HUM, WI, DL
    Enrollment Limit: 20 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    PHYS 10A: Introduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena I
    Instructor: Richard Williams
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: The goal of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the fundamentals of Newtonian Mechanics. Using Algebra based analytical techniques students will begin with the question of how objects move by studying Kinematics in one and two dimensions. Next, students will ask the question of why objects move by studying Newton’s laws of motion. Through careful manipulation of Newton’s second law students will explore the concepts of Work, Energy, and Energy conservation as well as the principles of momentum and collisions. Finally, students will apply the principles they have learned to statics, rotational dynamics, and Fluid Mechanics.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 7:00pm - 9:00pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2454
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN, QR
    Enrollment Limit: 20 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    PHYS 10B: Introduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena II
    Instructor: Richard Williams
    Prerequisites: PHYS 10A
    Course Description: The goal of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the fundamentals of waves, optics, and electricity and magnetism. Using algebraic techniques students will begin with an application of Newtonian mechanics called periodic motion. The concept of periodic motion will be expanded into the more general concept of wave mechanics. Wave mechanics will be used to study optics and the empirical nature of light. In the second half of the semester, students will study the classical theory of electricity and magnetism. The concept of electric and magnetic fields will be developed and shown to be the preferred conceptual tool for understanding the motion of charged objects. With the theory of electric and magnetic fields students will be able to understand real world systems such as electric circuits and gain a deeper understanding of light as an electromagnetic wave.Students will learn how to apply these concepts to solve problems. Because waves, optics, and electricity and magnetism are a classical theory students will apply the fundamentals of Newtonian Mechanics in order to understand these new concepts. Students will also learn how physics, as a discipline, asks questions about the natural world.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, W, Th
    Time: 7:00pm - 9:00pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2455
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SN, QR
    Enrollment Limit: 20 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    POL 15A - Section 1: Introduction to International Relations - Section 1
    Instructor: Kerry Chase
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: This course introduces the academic study of International Relations. Topics include the nature of the state system, the outbreak and settlement of violent conflicts, the sources of international conflict and cooperation, and the origins and effects of international institutions and international agreements. The course unfolds in three parts: 1) conceptual and historical foundations; 2) contending theoretical perspectives; 3) issues in international security. Prior knowledge of or coursework in Politics or International Relations is not required.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2396
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    POL 15A - Section 2: Introduction to International Relations - Section 2
    Instructor: Kerry Chase
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: This course introduces the academic study of International Relations. Topics include the nature of the state system, the outbreak and settlement of violent conflicts, the sources of international conflict and cooperation, and the origins and effects of international institutions and international agreements. The course unfolds in three parts: 1) conceptual and historical foundations; 2) contending theoretical perspectives; 3) issues in international security. Prior knowledge of or coursework in Politics or International Relations is not required.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2468
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees:
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    PSYC 148A: Applied Statistical Computing in R
    Instructor: Xiaodong Liu
    Prerequisites: PSYC 51a or equivalent.
    Course Description: This course is designed for students who would like to learn to do statistical computing/programming in R and for students with introductory statisticsbackground who would like to further their understanding of inferential statistics and statistical modeling. R is the platform for this course. It will be introduced in a way that helps make the connection between data preparation and manipulation, datageneration/simulation, data presentation (descriptively and graphically), statistical concepts, and statistical modeling. Additionally, through R programming, students will learn to document the analytic process for reproducibility of research work. Topics of statistical computing include methods of describing data, numerical summary and graphical presentation of data, computing of probability, density, and quantiles based on given distributions (including Gaussian distribution, t-distribution, F-distribution, and binomial distribution), simulation and data generation, and writing functions for custom statistics. While the main theme of this course is on statistical computing with R, we will emphasize the applied aspect through using data from empirical studies.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2034
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS, QR
    Enrollment Limit: 10 students
    Course Classification: Available for Graduate Credit
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    PSYC 33A: Developmental Psychology
    Instructor: Teresa Mitchell
    Prerequisites: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a).
    Course Description: Developmental psychology is the study of behavioral change and the emergence of new forms/behaviors as individual organisms develop. This (most) dynamic and interesting domain of psychology tackles one of the hardest problems in the discipline -- characterizing the origins of behavior. In this course we will examine behavioral and brain development from conception to adolescence. We will learn about major theories of development, the techniques used to study fetal, infant, and child behavior, and how to think critically about major findings in the literature.
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:10am - 1:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2024
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    PSYC 51A - Section 1: Statistics - Section 1
    Instructor: Jutta Wolf
    Prerequisites: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) or the permission of the instructor. This course normally should be completed by the end of the sophomore year.
    Course Description: This course serves as an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Statistics is used to find meaning in observations by collecting, summarizing, analyzing, and interpreting numerical information about subjects of interest, and it is used to make decisions that go beyond the observation. Since this is a psychology course, techniques useful in the behavioral sciences will be emphasized. Students will learn the theory of statistical decisions, practical application of statistical software (SPSS), how to translate analyzed statistics into convincing written arguments, and how to evaluate presented statistics.In more detail, topics of the course include methods for describing data, normal, t-, ?2-, and F- distributions, hypothesis testing, simple correlation and regression analysis, and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Data and examples from empirical studies will be used to elaborate on when an analytic method is appropriate and how the method can help address the research questions or test the research hypotheses. Students will have ample opportunities to practice using each method through take-home assignments, in-class exercises, examinations, and SPSS reports. Students will receive extensive instruction in the use of SPSS.Learning Goals:• To translate observations and questions about the world into statistical statements and questions• To understand why and when you need statistics• To describe the world in numerical terms and to organize the data into useful summaries• To understand the key concepts of hypothesis testing and inferential statistics• To understand the principles related to each of the statistical method covered in this course.• To know how to select and to perform the appropriate statistical procedure for your data • To know how to set up and do the related data analysis in SPSS• To know how to read and interpret the output in SPSS, communicate the results, and discuss statistical conclusions
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2025
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS, DL, QR
    Enrollment Limit: 10
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
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    PSYC 52A: Research Methods and Laboratory in Psychology
    Instructor: Jutta Wolf
    Prerequisites: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) and PSYC 51a. This course normally should be completed by the end of the sophomore year.
    Course Description: Psychology is the science of studying human behavior. Research Methods is a course designed to give you experience with designing, conducting, analyzing, interpreting, and communicating scientific psychological research. You will learn this through short presentations summarizing the necessary background, in-class exercises, and most importantly, through actual hands-on training on the fundamentals of conducting psychological research. The primary focus is “learning by doing.” As this class emphasizes active participation, making up in-class assignments is not possible, so regular class attendance and participation are very important. Grading will be based on four written reports, homework assignments, one poster presentation, and in-class participation. Psychology 51a is required as a prerequisite. Participating in Research Methods will enable you to• think critically about research• thoughtfully design experiments• analyze experimental results using statistical methods (and SPSS)• critically interpret experimental results• communicate your findings to others by technical reports written clearly, concisely, and objectively using APA format
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2054
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS, WI, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
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    REL 151A: The Buddha: His Life and Teachings
    Instructor: Yu Feng
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: This course is an introduction to Buddhism, one of the major religions of the world. Founded by Siddgartha Gautama or the Buddha in 6th century B.C., Buddhism has spread from South Asia to other parts of Asia into a great variety of distinctive schools of thoughts. Although at the present world Asia is still the place with the greatest Buddhist population, Buddhism has also expanded to Europe and America as well. The term “Buddhism” refers to a vast and complex religious and philosophical tradition with a history that stretches over some 2,500 years. As for living Buddhism, it divides, conventionally, into three major traditions: First, the Theravada tradition of Sri Lank and South-East Asia; second, the Mahayana tradition of China (proper), Korea, and Japan; and third, Tibetan Buddhism. While this course will take all the three traditions into account, we shall, however, focus on the Mahayana tradition.This course will be a combination of a series of lectures and seminar style discussions based on intensive readings, mainly, the English translation of the original Sanskrit, Chinese, or Japanese materials. The course will have the following five units:Unit One: Buddha and early Indian BuddhismLecture Topics: • Timeline of the Development of Buddhism• The Ancient Indian Society and the Caste System• Religious Ideas Prior to Buddhism• The Life of BuddhaReadings: • Four Noble Truths• Eight Fold Path• The Birth of the Holy One• Tales of Buddha• Buddhist Precepts and CodesUnit Two: Mahayana BuddhismLecture Topics:• What is Mahayana Buddhism?• What is the difference between a Buddha and a Bodhisattva?• What are the differences between the “conventional truth” and the “ultimate truth”?• What is meant by the Sunya or Emptiness?• What is the significance of the concept of cause and effect in the Mahayana philosophy?Readings:• The Heart Sutra • The Middle Way of Nagarjuna • Examination of Nirvana by Nagarjuna • The Emptiness of Unreal by Monk ZhaoUnit Three: Zen (Chan) BuddhismLecture Topics: • From Bodhidharma to the Six Patriarch, the Development of Zen Buddhism• Does Everyone have a Buddha Nature?• From Gradual Enlightenment to Sudden Enlightenment• The Role of Meditation• The Crazy ZenReadings:• Platform Sutra Chapters 1-4, 10• Zen Case Study: Brick and Cart• Zen Case Study: Bridge and Lady• Zen Case Study: Buddha and Cow Manure• Zen Case Study: Devil Wrote the Scriptures• Zen Case Study: Eating and Sleeping• Zen Case Study: Choose to Go Down to Hell• Zen Case Study: Hit with Stick• Zen Case Study: Killing the Cat• Zen Case Study: Rain and the Umbrella • Zen Case Study: Red Fox• Zen Case Study: Water and CupUnit Four: Buddhist Rituals and ArtsIn this Unit, the instructor and course assistants will introduce the fundamental knowledge of mudras, statues, dress styles of monks and nuns, and other Buddhist symbols. There will be a visual recognition test.Unit Five: The Humanistic BuddhismThis unit will discuss the modern development of Buddhism with emphasis on the Humanistic Buddhism headquartered in Taiwan.Readings:• The Human Centered Buddhism by Master Yin Shun• Quotations from Master Hsing YunClass Meeting Time and Place• Time: 11am-1:40pm Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday• Kutz 130Requirements:Success in this 4 credit hour course is based on the expectation that students will spend a minimum of 9 hours of study time per week in preparation for class.Students of this class must attend all the classes, actively participate in group projects, and complete all assignments in time.If you are a student with documented disability on record at Brandeis University and wish to have reasonable accommodation made for you in this class, please see me immediately.Textbook:All the needed reading materials are online.Grading:• Class attendance, Quizzes, and participation in on class discussion: 20%• Period tests: 36% (12% each)• Mid-term Paper: 20%• Final Exam: 24%
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:10am - 1:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2055
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: HUM, NW
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Available for Graduate Credit
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
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    SOC 182A: Applied Research Methods
    Instructor: Charlotte Powley
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: This course provides an introduction to research methods and quantitative analysis commonly used in sociology. The course assumes no prior knowledge of research methods, but it does assume an interest in why we conduct research, how research studies are designed, and a willingness to analyze the research methods and results of different research studies. This class fulfills Brandeis’ Quantitative Reasoning (QR) requirement, which means that there will be a strong focus on understanding numeric data. Success in this four-credit course is based on the expectation that students will spend on average a minimum of 9 hours of study time per week in preparation for class (readings, papers, latte posts, STATA exercises.)
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 11:10am - 1:40pm
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2445
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS, DL, QR
    Enrollment Limit:
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    SOC 1A: Order and Change in Society
    Instructor: Samantha Leonard
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: An introduction to the sociological perspective, with an emphasis on an analysis of problems of social order and change. Topics include gender, work and family, poverty and inequality, race and ethnicity, democracy, social movements, community, and education. This online course will introduce students to the core concepts and research methods of sociology.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2035
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Course Syllabus:  external link
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    THA 15B - Section 1: Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication - Section 1
    Instructor: Jennifer Cleary
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: Public Speaking is an often-misunderstood form of communication consisting of both talking with and listening to an audience: it is a conversation. In this course, students will engage with public speaking skills and experiences through recorded and live video presentation. The overall course goals are for students to feel comfortable, confident, and prepared to succeed in a variety of speaking situations, to learn how to speak comfortably and effectively on video (both live and recorded), and to manage any fears of public speaking through practice, discussion, and collegial support/feedback. The course is structured to allow for students to enjoy speaking, to build a caring online learning community, and to learn from each other. Connecting with other human beings in this manner is essential for personal and professional communication skills and can be done successfully online.This course is crafted as an online lab in speaking and listening. Students will be evaluated on their contributions to the collective learning community as well as on their own individual progress.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2036
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: OC
    Enrollment Limit: 10 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    THA 15B - Section 2: Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication - Section 2
    Instructor: Jennifer Cleary
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: Public Speaking is an often-misunderstood form of communication consisting of both talking with and listening to an audience: it is a conversation. In this course, students will engage with public speaking skills and experiences through recorded and live video presentation. The overall course goals are for students to feel comfortable, confident, and prepared to succeed in a variety of speaking situations, to learn how to speak comfortably and effectively on video (both live and recorded), and to manage any fears of public speaking through practice, discussion, and collegial support/feedback. The course is structured to allow for students to enjoy speaking, to build a caring online learning community, and to learn from each other. Connecting with other human beings in this manner is essential for personal and professional communication skills and can be done successfully online.This course is crafted as an online lab in speaking and listening. Students will be evaluated on their contributions to the collective learning community as well as on their own individual progress.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2037
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: OC
    Enrollment Limit: 10 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
    X
    THA 2A: Introduction to Theater: From the Page to the Stage
    Instructor: Alexander Jacobs
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: This course is intended for non-majors. Does not count towards the major or minor in Theater Arts. An introduction and investigation of theater in its many aspects. This course will acquaint the student with the theatrical elements of production and performance and familiarize the student with the role of artist and audience.
    Session: Online Session
    Day: Online
    Time:
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2397
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: CA
    Enrollment Limit: 15 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: Yes
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
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    UWS 16A: Sex and Advertising
    Instructor: Doug Kirshen
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: Sex Sells! It’s the immortal truism of the advertising industry. But how does sex sell? For decades, advertisers have used hot bods and innuendo to suggest that power and pleasure can be bought. In the 1970s, the battle cry, “You’ve come a long way, Baby!” pushed cigarettes as the hip accessories of feminism and the sexual revolution. Today, brands blend consumerism with gender activism, invite LGBTQ to the mainstream marketplace, and tempt millennials with new promises of sex and success. In this course, students find and share advertising that delights, infuriates, and perplexes them as they are introduced to the power of writing as a means of communication and a process of thinking and understanding. In a series of assignments, they read, draft, review, and revise, working in peer groups and individually with their instructor. In the first essay, they dissect their choice of pornographic food commercials, Budweiser bromances, and Calvin Klein billboards that titillate consumers and reshape social constructs of masculinity and femininity. The research paper challenges students to locate and comprehend recent studies of sex and gender in advertising and apply them to a defined set of ads or a major campaign of their choice. Online course syllabus: https://bit.ly/UWS16a20
    Session: Session I
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2425
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: UWS
    Enrollment Limit: 10 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link
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    UWS 48A: Love: Where, When, How, Who?
    Instructor: Martha Lagace
    Prerequisites: None
    Course Description: What is love? How does society encourage or discourage it? Who gets to fall in love and why? For many years, the study of love seemed to belong to poets, painters, singers, and playwrights. Scholars in different fields like history and anthropology avoided studying love, claiming that it was too special—too personal, maybe too sacred—to be a topic of reflection and analysis. Yet love is all around us. What does it mean and do? With progressively longer writing assignments, this course explores real case studies, scholarly views and research, and a documentary film to study how love conforms to and challenges the prevailing social order and becomes a force for societal change or continuity. We will analyze readings about how people living in Africa, the USA, the Middle East, and Asia have described and experienced love as a vital emotion despite the social pressures they face. As part of Major Assignments 2 and 3 (below), students will research a love-related issue of their choice from anywhere in the world, and may choose from texts including journalism, ethnographies, legal studies, films, works of art, novels, and other mediums. Throughout our course, students learn to use writing as a recursive process of thinking and communication. Students gain experience in generating original questions and pursuing independent research. In support of these goals—which will help you throughout your college years and future career—we work together on three main assignments: #1: Lens essay. In this assignment you will formulate an argument about the challenges of modern love among a certain group of non-U.S. people. #2: Research proposal. For this assignment you will choose a story of love from a variety of genres and write a detailed proposal about how you will approach your subsequent research essay. #3: Research essay. For this assignment you will use your research proposal as a guide to make an argument about love in a particular context of societal values. The course also gives students facility in understanding and recognizing how the same topic (in this case, love) is studied and described in different academic disciplines including literature, biochemistry, history, and the social sciences.
    Session: Session II
    Day: M, T, TH
    Time: 8:30am - 11:00am
    Credit Hours: 4 Credits
    Sage Class Number: 2426
    Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: UWS
    Enrollment Limit: 10 students
    Course Classification: Undergraduate Level Course
    Course Tuition: $3,050 (+$50 Once per summer Registration Fee)
    Course Fees: None
    Open to High School Students: No
    Instructor Biography Link:  external link
    Course Syllabus:  external link